type-2 diabetes

Bad Breath: A Possible Early Sign of Diabetes

August 1st, 2020

We Are Happy To Answer Your Bad Breath Questions | Katy, TX

With roughly 1.5 million Americans diagnosed each year, diabetes remains a silent killer, as early symptoms are often easy to miss. Interestingly, your breath could be warning you that something’s going on in your body. One of the many potential causes of bad breath, also known as halitosis, includes diabetes.

So, What is Diabetes?

The latest statistics noted by the American Diabetes Association reveal that approximately 34.2 million (10.5%) Americans had a diagnosis of diabetes in 2018. Plus, a whopping 88 million (34.5%) individuals aged 18 years or older have prediabetes in the U.S.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body has too much blood sugar (glucose) within the bloodstream. Some of the most common types of diabetes that you may have heard of include Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes, the body is blocked from producing insulin, which is normally released by the pancreas to absorb the sugar from the foods you eat for energy. Therefore, treatment involves taking insulin each day to help keep blood sugar levels under control. Type 1 is believed to be caused by an autoimmune response. On the other hand, individuals with Type 2 diabetes suffer from inadequate amounts of insulin release, or their bodies no longer appropriately respond to the action of insulin. Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with healthy lifestyle habits, including exercise, a healthy diet, and practicing good oral hygiene! Diabetes can have a negative, and sometimes life-threatening impact on major organs, including your heart, kidneys, and eyes.

 

Diabetes and Your Oral Health - McOmie Family Dentistry

Bad breath, a possible early sign of diabetes?

Individuals with diabetes may experience bad breath for several reasons which may be detected early. Early diagnosis and treatment of pre-diabetes and diabetes is important for early management and to lower the risk of detrimental complications to your overall health. Some of the common causes of bad breath in pre-diabetic/diabetic patients can include periodontal disease or ketoacidosis:

Periodontal disease:

  • What some people may not know is that diabetes can impact your oral health, and vice versa! This two-way relationship has been shown in several studies revealing a significant link between uncontrolled diabetes and the more severe form of gum disease, periodontitis, as well as severe gum disease being associated with high blood sugar levels.
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves oral bacteria which attack the oral tissues and bone that surround your teeth. Other systemic diseases, like heart disease and strokes, are linked to both diabetes and periodontal disease. Bad breath is a common sign of periodontal disease, and is typically a result of the bacteria within the mouth that produce volatile sulfur compounds. If blood sugar levels are not controlled, periodontal disease can progress and lead to tooth loss.

Ketoacidosis (DKA):

  • One of the complications of diabetes is ketoacidosis. This condition occurs when the body does not have enough insulin, which leads to certain cells not receiving enough energy from the uptake of sugar.
  • This causes your body to break down fat for energy, which consequently makes a high amount of acids in the blood called ketones. A high amount of ketones in your body can lead to bad breath, and you may notice a smell similar to nail polish. Once reaching an unsafe level, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs, which can present with a sweet and fruity odor on your breath, frequent urination, trouble breathing, confusion, abdominal pain, nausea, and/or vomiting. This condition can be life-threatening, and immediate medical attention is necessary if you experience these symptoms.Common Causes of Bad Breath

Take a look at some of the other associations between diabetes, oral health, and bad breath:

Dry mouth:

  • Diabetics may experience dry mouth, which can also cause bad breath. Your saliva does more than you may think! Without saliva, acid produced by oral bacteria can attack the surfaces of your teeth and lead to tooth decay/cavities. Not to mention, saliva helps wash away leftover food particles that the bacteria feed on. To fight dry mouth, stay hydrated with water. Chewing xylitol sugar free gum can also help stimulate saliva production. Dry mouth may also be a result of certain medications, including those taken for diabetes. Be sure to keep your dentist in the loop regarding all of your current medications.

Greater Risk of Infections:

  • Individuals with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing infections due to a weakened immune system. Plus, uncontrolled diabetics may experience slow wound healing due to poor circulation from high blood sugar levels. It is especially important to stay healthy and keep your immune system strong during these unprecedented times. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals with Type 2 diabetes are considered at a high risk for experiencing illness from COVID-19. Make sure to continue practicing social distancing, proper hand-washing and disinfecting, and wear a face covering to help fight coronavirus.
  • In addition, people with diabetes may be at a higher risk of developing an oral yeast infection, also known as oral thrush. Oral thrush often appears as a white coat on the tongue or inside of the cheeks and can result in uncomfortable mouth sores and ulcers, along with a foul odor and taste. Your dentist will be able to diagnose oral thrush and offer treatment recommendations.

Remember, your oral cavity is a window to the rest of your body so be sure to take care of it! Your body may be showing you small signs that relate to a bigger health issue. Keep up with your regular dental appointments and practice good oral hygiene at home. When tooth brushing, don’t forget to brush your tongue, which is a common ground for odor producing bacteria.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1312660/type-2-diabetes-signs-symptoms-diabetic-ketoacidosis-halitosis-blood-sugar

https://www.diabetes.org/resources/statistics/statistics-about-diabetes

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25342350/

https://www.shalby.org/blog/endocrinology-diabetology/diabetes-silent-killer/

https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/bad-breath

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/diabetes-and-other-endocrine-disorders/diabetes-and-dental-problems-0614

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fneed-extra-precautions%2Fgroups-at-higher-risk.html#diabetes

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetic-ketoacidosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20371551

https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmcomiedentistry.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F11%2Fdiabetes-oral-health-865x519.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmcomiedentistry.com%2Fdiabetes-oral-health%2F&tbnid=wibCrzMbrsmcWM&vet=12ahUKEwi0utSJsPrqAhUXRFMKHcY_CisQMygAegUIARCqAQ..i&docid=us3xVHL0O5gD9M&w=865&h=519&q=diabetes%20oral%20health&ved=2ahUKEwi0utSJsPrqAhUXRFMKHcY_CisQMygAegUIARCqAQ

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.smilegeneration.com%2Fblog%2Fsmile-facts%2Fcommon-causes-of-bad-breath%2F&psig=AOvVaw2l2w6ICnsYwZEoznSI1gqT&ust=1596384118408000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJCQk7aw-uoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Flathropdentalcenter.com%2Fblog%2F2017%2F06%2Fwe-are-happy-to-answer-your-bad-breath-questions%2F&psig=AOvVaw2l2w6ICnsYwZEoznSI1gqT&ust=1596384118408000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJCQk7aw-uoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAT

Craving Sugar? Check your Sleep Pattern!

February 20th, 2020

Craving something sweet constantly? Surprisingly, your sleep pattern may be the reason why. According to a study conducted this month in the Journal of the American Heart Association, lack of sleep may play a role in shaping your diet by stimulating cravings for sugar and unhealthy fats. The study performed by researchers at Columbia University's Irving Medical Center focused on sleep quality and diets of approximately 500 women aged between 20 and 76 years old for a period of one year. It was found that the women who reported less sleep also consumed more added sugars and fats within their diets. The participants of the study averaged less than 7 hours of sleep each night, which is lower than the recommended 8 or more hours of sleep. Those who reported not sleeping well averaged an additional 500-800 calories, in addition to exceeding the recommended daily amounts of total and saturated fat, added sugars, and caffeine. They also lacked healthy food group items including fiber and grains in their diets. Our diets can significantly increase the risk of developing certain health problems, including obesity, heart disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and even sleep disorders.

Sleep can often times get put on the back burner, especially when we have a lot of work to accomplish. However, good quality and amount of sleep is necessary for our overall health, and can even be important for helping to prevent heart disease, particularly for women. Sleep deprivation is believed to both stimulate hunger and mask hormone signals that tell the body that it is full. Kicking the bad habit of eating junk food might just begin with a good night's rest! Plus, it goes both ways; a healthier diet may also improve your sleep.
If you're having trouble sleeping, talk with your primary care physician and dentist to help determine the cause.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/17/health/poor-sleep-quality-unhealthy-diet-wellness/index.html

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Drinking from a Can? Think Again!

December 4th, 2019

Ever wonder if drinking from a can, a glass, or using straw could make a difference to your teeth? We all know that foods and drinks can play a role on the health of your teeth, but many would not have thought that the way you consume your drink can also be an important factor. Well, as it turns out, your drinking method does matter when consuming sugary beverages!

Sugary drinks can cause a lot of damage to your teeth, and your body too. According to a study published in the Academy of General Dentistry people in the United States consume about one and a half cans of soda a day, and a total of 576 each year! The study found that people who drink soft drinks straight from the can are more likely to get tooth decay on their back molar teeth. Consuming sugary drinks like sodas and energy drinks increase your risk of weight gain, and developing several medical conditions including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and gout -and kids are not exempt! Children are 60% more likely to become obese with each sugary beverage consumed per day and are 2 times more susceptible to tooth decay.

Sugar as we know is what bacteria love to eat, and as a result the bacteria within your mouth produce acids that ultimately lead to tooth decay and breakdown your tooth enamel. But, we all have that craving for a soda every once and a while. That's why it is important to learn about preventative measures to take when consuming sugary beverages. Research shows that holding a drink in your mouth and taking long sips is detrimental to your teeth because it increases the acidity within your mouth. A smaller drop in the pH occurs when you drink the beverage straight down quickly and in one sitting. Sipping on a soda can throughout the day leads right to decay due to the constant exposure of your teeth to the sugars. The American Dental Association (ADA) also recommends using a straw positioned towards the back of your mouth when consuming beverages to avoid contact of the drink with your teeth. This of course does not prevent you from developing cavities, but it will help reduce your risk.

Not to mention, when you consume your sugary beverages also matters. It is best to do so during mealtime as opposed to by itself. Rinsing with water is also important to help wash away the sugars. In addition, avoid brushing immediately after consuming sugary drinks, because your tooth enamel is in a weakened state and can be harmed from brushing.

Remember, everything in moderation is key. Always try to be mindful of what drinks you are consuming and how you are consuming them.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/healthy-eating-active-living/sugar-smarts/be-sugar-smart/Pages/Health-Effects-of-Sugary-Drinks.aspx

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050616060426.htm

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/does-drinking-out-of-cans-affect-your-risk-for-tooth-decay

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September Is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September 5th, 2018

What is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month?

Did you know that over 23 million children are obese or overweight in the United States? National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month is a yearly campaign with the goal of letting individuals know the health hazards of obesity, particularly for children. Approximately one third of children in the U.S. are at risk of type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease. But, with the knowledge and proper resources, we can make these statistics and the health of our children better. Several organizations and professionals will be joining together especially this month to raise money, conduct research, and provide treatment to help battle childhood obesity.

Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem that can have a lifelong impact on the overall health. Chronic conditions such as asthma, joint issues, Type 2 diabetes, and sleep apnea may develop at higher rates due to childhood obesity. Also, it has been found that children with obesity often are more likely to experience depression and lower self-esteem. Surprisingly, obesity is also linked with an increased risk of developing periodontal disease due to the body's inflammatory response.

Several factors play a role in childhood obesity, such as genetics, metabolism, your child's home and community environment, as well as eating behavior and level of physical activity. It is important to encourage your child to stay active, get regular sleep, and to have a tooth-friendly healthy diet. When your child's energy is balanced it allows for healthier growth.

Some ways to help prevent obesity include measuring your child's Body Mass Index (BMI). This can be done using the CDC’s Child and Teen BMI Calculator to help identify your child's risk for obesity. Most importantly, make sure your child is provided with nutritious meals that include fruits and vegetables. Now that school is starting up, make sure to pack healthy lunches, which will not only keep your teeth healthy, but also your body! Have your child avoid sugary foods and beverages. Allow a certain amount of time for your child to be involved in physical activity each day. Not to mention, be a role model by following the same guidelines!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/threats-to-dental-health/ada-09-september-is-national-childhood-obesity-awareness-month

https://www.cdc.gov/features/childhoodobesity/index.html

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