utensils

Sweet (But-Teeth Friendly) Desserts

June 18th, 2013

It’s summer time! The school year is finally winding down, and we are excited to make are way down to the beach and enjoy some time out in the sun. Summer also brings ice cream, popsicles, cotton candy, and a whole bunch of food that may be delicious, but are also definitely not doing your teeth a favor.

Every grocery store is bound to have a section of an aisle dedicated to frozen desserts, which can range from strawberry ice cream to jolly rancher-flavored popsicles. Your taste buds may think it’s an excellent idea to grab a few on the go, but your teeth will beg to differ. Popsicles tend to have high sugar content, which will leave teeth susceptible to cavities and tooth decay. These frozen sweets also contain artificial coloring dye, which has been shown to contain carcinogens and maybe contribute Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Instead of getting a pack of popsicles from the grocery store, here are some healthy and enjoyable alternatives.

Smoothies: Milk shakes tend to be a summer favorite after a long soccer practice. While they do contain dairy, which is wonderful for teeth, they also contain lots of sugar, which is wonderful for bacteria in the mouth, not so much for teeth. Bacteria love feeding on sugary residue left in the mouth, and definitely won’t hold back when they are offered a ton from milk shakes. Instead of making a trip to the local diner, start the blender and add in some low-fat milk, yogurt, bananas, strawberries, and blueberries. A yummy smoothie will result, chock full of calcium, antioxidants, and vitamins. Homemade smoothies will allow you to control the amount of sugar that goes into the drink, and sweet and healthy fruit will do just the trick! Here’s a quick and easy recipe (link: http://bit.ly/16upE68) that will satisfy sweet-tooths but will keep teeth happy.

Yogurt Pops: Yogurt, cheese, milk and other dairy products are great saliva generators, protecting teeth from tooth decay. Calcium and phosphates found in milk and other dairy products can put minerals back in teeth, making them healthy and stronger. Here’s ( http://bit.ly/112tASF ) a great recipe for these delicious pops that will make the kids wanting more!

Remember: Desserts can be delicious and healthy at the same time; there’s always great foods out there that are also a treat for teeth as well. Here’s to a summer of healthy choices and yummy eats! If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelhennessey/2012/08/27/living-in-color-the-potential-dangers-of-artificial-dyes/

The Link Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

June 13th, 2013

26 million adults are known to be affected by diabetes. Statistics show that 1 out of 10 healthcare dollars are spent on diabetes. The link between periodontal disease and diabetes has been extensively studied over the past 50 years. There is strong evidence that diabetes is a risk factor for periodontitis and gingivitis. A study dating back to more than 30 years ago has already shown that children suffering from type 1 diabetes had a higher prevalence of gingival inflammation. Ervasti et al. examined patients with gingival bleeding and determined that there was greater amount of bleeding in patients with poorly controlled diabetes when compared to subjects that do not have diabetes and subjects with well-controlled diabetes. Research has also shown that types with type 2 diabetes also tend to have more gingival inflammation than the control group in the study.

Studies also show that the risk of developing periodontitis is increased when one has diabetes. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes have been found to be five times more likely to develop periodontitis. Research also supports the idea that there may be more bone loss linked to adults with diabetes. Subjects suffering from type 2 diabetes are three times more likely to develop periodontitis compared to subjects without diabetes.

Doctors were able to pinpoint the root cause of this relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. There is a protein known as the c-reactive protein (CRP), which is found in the blood stream. CRP levels rise with inflammation of blood vessels, which has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers have also shown that CRP is continuously produced in the presence of periodontal diseases. It is important to note that an individual cannot keep diabetes under control if he or she is also suffering from periodontal disease. It is absolutely crucial that diabetic patients maintain good oral health to keep CRP at bay.

Periodontal disease can affect your general health; read more here.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! They can assess the risk of periodontal disease and if need be our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi, can help.Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

Cianciola L, Park B, Bruck E, Mosovich L, Genco R. Prevalence of periodontal disease
in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (juvenile diabetes). JADA
1982;104(5):653-60.

Ervasti L, Knuuttila M, Pohjamo L, Haukipuro K. Relation between control of
diabetes and gingival bleeding. J Periodontol 1985;56(3):154-7.

http://www.diabetes.org/news-research/research/access-diabetes-research/greenfield-protein.html

http://www.ada.org/sections/professionalResources/pdfs/Perio_diabetes.pdf

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Can playing a musical instrument effect oral health?

June 11th, 2013

It has been widely accepted that playing a musical instrument can increase and nourish intelligence in children, but playing a used instrument can be a health risk as well.

General Dentistry published a clinical study that revealed that woodwind and brass instruments that have been previously used were found to be ridden with various bacteria and fungi some that have been linked to serious infectious and allergic diseases, which can further lead to conditions such as mouth breathing. Click here to read more about mouth breathing. Children who are involved with their school band or orchestra typically rent their instrument for over the course of the year. These instruments have already been played by other students and without proper cleaning, bacteria an fungi have been indubitably thriving in the instrument. The same growth has been seen in dentures, athletic mouth guards, and tooth brushes.

In the clinical study, 117 instrumental pieces, including mouthpieces, internal chambers, and cases were tested on 13 previously used instruments. There were 442 different bacteria found on the instruments, along with 58 molds and 19 yeasts. Mold can lead to the increased likelihood of developing asthma, while yeasts found on the instruments can lead to skin infections around the mouth and lips. These bacteria, fungi, mold, and yeast that are presence on these instruments are highly resistant to the antibiotics that are normally prescribed, which highlights the importance of sterilizing instruments that have been previously played. It is essential to wipe areas that come in contact with the skin and mouth frequently. Instruments should be cleaned on a regular basis with cleaning cloths and solution.

If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/142/5/490.3.fullv

The Importance for Teens to Balance a Fast-Paced Life and Oral Health

June 10th, 2013

Once that alarm starts going off in the morning, teens are on a jam-packed schedule, shuffling through classes, extracurricular activities, and sometimes even part-time jobs. In order to keep up with the pace, teens often make a grab for quick meals in form of carbonated beverages and “nutrition bars” to keep them on edge and alert for all of their obligations; however, this kind of lifestyle may leave teens with permanent damage to oral and overall health.

In a 2003 issue of General Dentistry, studies have shown that teens that constantly indulge in sugary drinks can result in premature loss of tooth enamel and the weakening of overall tooth structure. While research has deemed carbonated beverages and energy drinks detrimental for oral health, these sugary drinks can also affect overall bone growth in teens. Read more here. Adolescence is the known time period of optimal bone growth, when more nutrient-packed calories are necessary to fuel growing bodies and to strengthen teeth and bones. These calories tend to be counteracted when teens continue to take in high-carbohydrate foods, which are instead replacing healthy foods such as milk, vegetables, and fruits.

Reports have shown that these beverages are the main causes of increases cavities and obesity in teens today. Unfortunately, researchers expect obesity to remain a major issue as more pre-school-aged children continue to become more addicted to caffeine and sugar. The various acids found in sodas and energy drinks breakdown tooth enamel around cavity sealants and previously done restorations, which leads to more necessary dental treatment to prevent tooth loss.

Phosphoric acid in many carbonated drinks limits calcium absorption, influencing body density. By age 16, girls have acquired 90-96% of their bone mass, making adequate calcium intake extremely important. However, national statistics indicate that only 19% of girls ages 9-19 are receiving the recommended 1,3000 mg of calcium per day. The lack of calcium intake indubitably affects bone structure of the mouth, which can lead to complications such as periodontal bone loss.

While it is important for teens to work hard and strive to do their best, it is just as essential for them to watch what they consume and maintain a healthy lifestyle. If you have more questions, be sure to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=T&iid=333&aid=1335
http://www.healthywomen.org/condition/oral-health

Pacifiers:Do They Boost or Weaken Your Child’s Health?

June 7th, 2013

Many parents have been taught that sharing utensils or sucking on pacifiers to clean them can help a child build immunity. The journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics has even published a study detailing the immunological benefits of adult saliva. However there has been much debate about whether parents should follow this rule of thumb.

The American Dental Association (ADA) was quick to follow up this study with their respond, explaining that this may not be a good idea. ADA noted that the adult saliva contains a whole host of microorganisms that may be harmful to a child health. The transfer of saliva may end up increasing a baby’s chance of developing tooth decay in the future. Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, who is a spokesperson for the ADA, points to Streptococcus mutans as a bacteria present in adult saliva that my end up doing some serious damage to teeth.

However, there are others that continue to support the American Academy of Pediatrics. While they understand the risks of being more susceptible to bacteria, proponents of adult saliva transfer believe that should not be the main concern at hand. It has been argued that certain adults may not even have these harmful microorganisms present in their oral cavity. What should be priority is parents’ responsibility to provide good oral hygiene for their child. These dentists argue that no matter what, babies will continue to be exposed to different harmful microorganisms, whether it Is from what they consume or touch throughout the day. The key to limiting the progression of child tooth decay is to keep up with proper oral care. Parents need to be reminded of the importance of proper brushing, rinsing, and flossing for their child. Dentists believe that this aspect of oral health takes precedent over staying away from microorganisms that can harm the child.

Our pediatric Dentist, Dr. Pradhan, will more than willing to take care of your child's dental needs. Also, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts, questions,or concerns; they will be happy to answer them! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/news/8582.aspx

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/04/30/peds.2012-3345

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/260144.php

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