vitamin c

What To Expect When You're Expecting

June 23rd, 2016

 

When you're pregnant, you have to pay extra attention to your health, and especially your oral health. You might think that taking care of your teeth isn't as important as other aspects of your body, but oral hygiene is just as important!

This is because pregnancy could cause changes to the mouth. Some women may be more prone to gingivitis, which is a type of gum disease that results in red, tender, and sore gums. If not treated, gingivitis could lead to a more serious gum disease.

Instead of only brushing and flossing, make sure to rinse with a fluoride mouthwash and schedule regular appointments with your dentist. During your visit, let your dentist know what stage of pregnancy you're in and point out any changes in medications or special orders from your physician.

Maintaining a balanced diet is also particularly important during your pregnancy. You especially need sufficient quantities of vitamins A, C, and D, protein, calcium, and phosphorous. Avoid frequent snacking to prevent tooth decay, but when you do snack, choose raw fruits and vegetables, yogurt, or cheese.

If you experience morning sickness, rinse with a teaspoon of baking soda mixed with water to prevent stomach acid from damaging your teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/pregnancy-slideshow/?source=promospots&content=topstories&medium=pregnancy/

http://images.medicaldaily.com/sites/medicaldaily.com/files/2014/05/23/shutterstock115408348.jpg

Listen up, Kids: Dental Care for Children

October 9th, 2015

kidBelieve it or not, a third of children today have tooth decay before even starting school. According to statistics published by the Health & Social Care Information Centre, tooth decay is one of the main causes of hospital visits for children in elementary school. Surprisingly, 25,812 children ranging from ages 5 to 9 went to the hospital for tooth extractions in the last year alone.

Here are some tips below on how to protect your child’s teeth to make sure that your child doesn’t become part of these statistics!

  1. Drink less fruit juice!

Just because fruit juice is nutritious and often rich in vitamin C does not mean that it’s also beneficial for your teeth! Many juices have around the same amount of sugar as that in sodas, or even more. For instance, NPR states that apple juice contains 65.8 grams of sugar per liter, while cola contains 62.5 grams of sugar per liter. This copious amount of sugar leads to tooth decay. Furthermore, the acid from the juice destroys the enamel of teeth, which can cause teeth to deteriorate. Even the British Dental Association claims that 50% of children ranging from four to 18 years old show these signs.

Because of these harmful effects of fruit juice, dentists recommend water and milk as healthy beverage alternatives for children. If your child is still craving fruit juice, try to dilute it as much as possible and make sure that your child has a meal with it. Also, try your best to avoid letting your child have too much contact time with the cup and his or her teeth and instead opt for using a straw.

 

  1. Avoid dried fruit !

Dried fruit isn’t a good replacement for candy it has a great deal of sugar, and even worse, its sticky texture clings onto your child’s teeth. Due to these unhealthy properties, dried fruit can ruin enamel and rot your little one’s molars. Although chocolate isn’t a great option, dark chocolate is known to  be rich in antioxidants that help prevent the spread of tooth-decay causing bacteria.

Whole fruit can be a better option than dried fruit and fruit juice because it contains water and fibers that help wash away sugar from teeth. However, try not to feed your child more than one or two low-sugar fruit pieces (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwis, peaches, and pears) instead of high-sugar fruit pieces (grapes or pineapple) per day. Incorporate fruit into meals rather than simply having them as snacksBreadsticks, toast, cheese, nuts, or seeds are some healthier snack alternatives.

 

  1. Baby teeth matter!

It's important not to presume that just because baby teeth are not permanent, that they should not be taken care of! Your child’s permanent teeth are at a higher risk of decay and other dental problems when primary teeth decay. Baby tooth decay could lead children to experience dental anxiety, which could make them less likely to visit the dentist later on.

 

  1. Help your child brush his/her teeth!

Depending on how mature your child is, you should help brush your child’s teeth until at least age seven to ensure that they are using proper brushing techniques. 

 

  1. Proper brushing techniques!
  • Don’t let your child brush his/her teeth right after eating, particularly after eating or drinking something acidic. Doing so will brush the enamel away! Your child should either brush before eating breakfast or wait an hour after the meal. Chewing sugar-free gum can also be an effective way to clean teeth, because it produces saliva, which defends against decay, and brings mouths back to a neutral pH level.
  • It doesn’t matter if your child uses a manual or electric toothbrush. What’s important is that the brushing lasts for at least two minutes! Electric toothbrushes often have built-in timers, so this feature can be effective.
  • Don’t let your child rinse the toothpaste away right after brushing! The fluoride in the toothpaste can keep protecting his or her teeth for 30 minutes. Children under three should use toothpaste with 1,000 fluoride parts per million, while children over three should use adult toothpaste that contains 1,450 fluoride parts per million.

For many parents, the first time they took their children to the dentist was when their children were at least one year old. However, parents should set their first appointment for when their children’s teeth begin to come out, which is around five to six months old. Further oral health tips for children can be found here.

This past spring, we welcomed Dr. Van, our Pediatric Dentist, onto our caring team at the Wellesley Dental Group! Dr. Van strongly believes in the importance of creating a fun and welcoming atmosphere for patients as well as parents. One of his goals is to introduce good dental habits to our youth, preventing dental diseases later on in life.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://mouafaqbtc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/b4054a_0d4b9e685762e624649fbf8898f77c87.jpg

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/609471/Children-dental-care-truths-myths

http://www.thedentistar.com/images/import/images/glenview-kids-dentist.jpg

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/06/09/319230765/fruit-juice-vs-soda-both-beverages-pack-in-sugar-and-health-risk

Summertime in the City: What's Healthy and What's Not

June 2nd, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 12.31.25 PM

June is finally here and it will be hard for many of us to resist a cold drink on a hot summer day. With the many family barbecues and outings, you're sure to be in for a treat this summer. During the warmer months, there are many tasty foods and drinks at our convenience. However, some of these items aren’t so tooth-friendly. As we all know, it is important to limit the amount of sugary foods and drinks we intake to ensure a healthy smile. For the health of your mouth, which links to your overall health, try adding these healthy options to your plate and glass this summer:

Drink, Drink, and Drink more water:

A nice glass of water can be a refreshing drink as you relax by the poolside. Water is important for staying hydrated, especially when your active and the sun is shining. Your smile will also thank you if you rinse your mouth with water after meals. Water, particularly tap water, even has the benefit of containing fluoride.

Watermelon:

Watermelon, made of 92% water, is another tasty  and healthy snack that will keep you hydrated this summer. It contains  lycopene, which helps keep skin protected. Also, many foods that are mainly composed of water have fewer calories. Your kids may even enjoy making watermelon popsicles!

Milk:

Milk is a great alternative to sugary drinks because it has been found to reduce levels of acid produced by plaque bacteria. Milk helps remineralize teeth by providing calcium to keep your teeth strong.

Sugar-Free Gum:

Chewing sugar-free gum can help to stimulate saliva flow and ultimately help to wash away left behind foods. However, it is not clear whether or not xylitol, commonly found in sugar-free gum, actually lowers the risk of developing dental cavities.

Strawberries:

Strawberries are in season and packed with healthy ingredients. Strawberries contain malic acid, which is known to whiten enamel. They also contain many antioxidants and vitamin C, which can help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, and promote eye health.

Cheese:

Cheese is full of calcium, the protein casein, and vitamin D, all good for the health of your teeth. Researchers have discovered that cheese helps increases the pH levels of dental plaque, helping to reduce tooth decay.

Pears:

Pears contain a wealth of fiber that will benefit your teeth. They help to produce saliva and lower plaque levels in the mouth.

Apples:

Crispy apples are full of vitamins and nutrients. Full of water and lots of fiber, apples help to scrub and clean the surface of your teeth.

Vegetables:

Veggies ranging from carrots rich in Vitamin A to dark leafy greens rich in iron, can make a great snack to chew on. Including vegetables in your diet is essential for the health of your teeth and body.

Cranberries:

Research has suggested that cranberries help lower the risk of cavities by helping to keep plaque from sticking to teeth. But, you may want to pay attention to the labels on cranberry products, as many of them can contain added sugars to compensate for their naturally tart flavor.

 

Some foods and drinks that are hard-to-resist, but should be avoided to keep strong and healthy teeth, include:

 

Soft Drinks, Sports Drinks, Sweet Tea, and Juice: Drinking a cold soda may sound refreshing, but it is damaging to tooth enamel. It can also dehydrate your body and make you feel more thirsty. Even sports drinks, artificially sweetened drinks, and concentrated fruit juice contain sugars for the bacteria in dental plaque to feed on and produce harmful acids. The acid then tears away at tooth enamel and can eventually lead to tooth decay. Highly acidic drinks can even cause heartburn and stomach pain. Sipping on these drinks throughout the day rather than at meal times should also be avoided because saliva production is not at its peak. Saliva is important for washing away bacteria and food particles.

Ice Cream:

The many flavors of ice cream are delicious, but unfortunately is full of sugar. Some individuals may also experience tooth sensitivity. Sensitive teeth results when the dentin underneath tooth enamel becomes exposed. This can cause pain, but can be treated. If you do have a taste for ice cream, try and select ice cream with less sugar.

Citrus Fruits:

As we all know, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruits are very acidic. These fruits contain citric acid and can be damaging to teeth if consumed frequently.

Vinegar:

A common practice, but an unhealthy one, is to mix vegetables with vinegar. This acidic combination can erode tooth enamel. Pickles are also very acidic.

Granola and Energy Bars:

These items may appear to be good for teeth, but often the dried fruit and other ingredients can be sticky, chewy, and hard to get off of teeth.

Candy: 

We all know that candy contains a lot of sugar, and should be avoided for the protection of your smile.

 

It is important to remember that if you do choose some of the not-so-healthy foods and beverages, consume them in moderation. Also, avoid snacking between meals, as acids can stick around for up to 20 minutes after eating. Not to mention, be mindful of the dyes used in many foods and beverages that can cause tooth discoloration. Practice good oral health habits and lean more towards a tooth-friendly diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/blog/fresh-breath-happenings/teeth-friendly-summer-food-ideas-34659.asp

http://greatist.com/health/healthy-teeth-foods

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-watermelon-popsicles-10713

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dwBqWs6_udQ/UBYvQhjW5TI/AAAAAAAACBY/YdNg1weBEVk/s1600/watermelon+popsicles.JPG

Is “An Apple a Day” Good for your Teeth?

September 18th, 2014

5083649844_afe8e9e1ac_zWill an apple a day only keep the doctor away? What about the dentist? Apples are not only recognized for their health benefits, but they also have an impact on teeth!

With school starting up again, the easiest way to lead children away from candies and other sugary foods is to offer healthy snack alternatives. Eating fresh fruit is a good alternative to drinking fruit juices, which have a high level of acidity and sugar. Apples make great healthy snacks that are easy to throw into your child’s lunchbox. Apples contain a wealth of vitamins and nutrients, which are important for maintaining strong teeth.Apples and other crunchy foods, including vegetables, can act as nature’s toothbrush by helping to remove stains and brighten teeth. The tough texture of apples helps stimulate the gums, clean teeth, and fight bacteria. Yet, it is important to note that they certainly do not replace brushing and flossing! Chewing on an apple also increases the production of saliva. The more saliva, the better! Saliva helps wash away food particles and keep plaque from forming. In addition, apples are packed with fiber and a high water content, which helps to neutralize acids that destroy tooth enamel.

On the other hand, it is important to remember that apples do contain sugar and acid, which can erode teeth. To counteract this effect, brushing and rinsing your mouth afterward is essential in preventing erosion and other oral problems.

Indeed, a healthy diet does have an effect on dental health. Fruits containing Vitamin C can help promote a healthy smile. Individuals that lack vitamin C are at an increased risk of experiencing bleeding gums. Carrots, celery, and dark leafy vegetables also make good snacks because they are loaded with vitamin A, vitamin C, beta carotene, phosphorus, calcium and magnesium.

An apple a day can be great, but good oral habits must also be implemented. A balanced diet that includes grains, fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, and dairy is essential in maintaining healthy teeth. Although a healthy diet can “keep the dentist away” with unnecessary oral health problems, it is still necessary to visit the dentist for regular checkups and cleanings!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Video-Library/Apples-And-Oral-Health.cvsp

https://www.nutritionmasterfoods.com/WHY-EAT-THESE-INGREDIENTS

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4147/5083649844_afe8e9e1ac_z.jpg

What Vitamins Your Teeth Need

May 15th, 2014

The foods we eat can have a huge impact on oral health.  As most people know, foods high in sugar can cause cavities and drinks like black coffee can stain teeth.  Other than sugar content or staining capabilities , different kinds of vitamins can also have a huge impact on oral health.  Taking vitamin supplements can prevent tooth decay and promote healthy gums.  The following vitamins can be incorporated into a balanced diet and oral health regimen.

vitamins-minerals

Vitamin C
Vitamin C prevents gum inflammation and helps to heal soft, bleeding gums.  Citrus fruits like oranges and lemons are known to be high in this essential vitamin.  Some lesser known foods that are high in Vitamin C include bell peppers and broccoli.

Vitamin A
Vitamin A prevents dry mouth, aids in the healing inflamed gums, and helps to maintain the mucous membranes of the gums.  Vitamin A can be found in beef, spinach, kale, cheese, and eggs.

Vitamin D
Vitamin D is necessary for optimal absorption of calcium.  Calcium helps with the development of healthy, strong teeth and can be found in milk and fatty fish like salmon.

Vitamins B12 and B2
A deficiency in these essential vitamins can lead to painful mouth sores.  Vitamin B12 can be found in red meat, chicken, liver, and dairy products.  Vitamin B2 can be found in almonds, bagels, and spinach.

Iron
An iron deficiency can also lead to mouth sores and an inflamed tongue.  Iron is available in capsule form and can be found in many common foods like bran cereals and nuts.

Potassium
Potassium is necessary for proper nerve function and muscle development.  Legumes, bananas, and whole grains are great sources for this.

Vitamin B3 (niacin)
A niacin deficiency can be a cause of bad breath and canker sores.  Adding more chicken or fish into your diet can alleviate these symptoms.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Sources:

Image credit: http://girlgonehealthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/vitamins-minerals.jpg

Consuming Cheese Can Prevent Cavities

January 20th, 2014

Happy National Cheese Lover's Day!

Dairy has been long known to be packed with a great amount of calcium, protein, and vitamin D in every serving. It has always been said that drinking milk and other dairy products will keep bones healthy and strong, but there has not been much research done on how beneficial dairy products are to oral health until recently. General Dentistry just published in their most recent journal issue that cheese and other dairy products have the potential of keeping cavities at bay.

Researchers that conducted the study looked at 68 participants between the ages of 12 and 15. The subjects had their dental plaque pH checked before eating cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. Previous studies indicate that a pH level below 5.5 makes an individual more susceptible to the wearing down of enamel, resulting in tooth erosion. The higher the pH level, the lower the chance an individual has of getting cavities.

The subjects were randomly split into three groups: one that ate cheddar cheese, another that drank milk, and a final group that ate sugar-free yogurt. After eating their chosen type of dairy for 3 minutes, the subjects were asked to rinse their mouth with water. The pH level of each subject’s mouth was then measured 10, 20, and 30 minutes the dairy product was consumed. The researchers found that the individuals who drank milk and ate sugar-free yogurt did not have a significant change in pH level; however, those who ate cheese showed a great increase in pH levels after each time interval, indicating that this particular dairy product may be the key to preventing cavities. The results suggest that because there is more of a need to chew when consuming cheese, there is an increase in saliva production, which also leads to an increase of pH levels. The researchers also found compounds inherent in cheese binds to tooth enamel, preventing acid from causing further damage.

This new finding gives us more of a reason to add a slice of cheese to a sandwich. Continue to make sure daily that your diet increases and strengthens oral health!

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605130118.htm

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-get-your-diary

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57587876/cheesy-grins-may-protect-teeth-from-cavities/

Picture Credit: http://dailym.ai/17rk9ET

Local recommendation: Wasik Cheeseshop 

Vitamins: Key to Healing after Oral Surgery

January 13th, 2014

While vitamin C is a great way to boost your immune system, vitamins can also play a major role in timely recovery after oral surgery.

The Academy of General Dentistry explained that patients lacking in vitamin C have shown to recover at a slower rate. Appropriate amounts of vitamin C, along with other vitamins, minerals, fats, and protein, were reported to be essential for the growth and regeneration of normal tissues. Nutrients work both individually and cooperatively to move along the healing process. Tissue maintenance and repair requires the help of carbohydrates, fat and protein. Recovery of these tissues involves vitamin C, along with vitamins such as vitamins E, B and K.

Vitamin C is responsible for the making collagen (connective tissue) that strengthens skin muscles and blood vessels; this is key to proper wound healing.

Vitamin E has the ability to...thin blood, preventing blood platelets from clumping. It also speed up cell regeneration and promotes blood circulation, strengthening capillary walls while nourishing cells.

Vitamin B is crucial for carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. It facilitates energy-releasing reactions and can also help deliver oxygen and nutrients, allowing energy pathways to run smoothly.

Vitamin K promotes blood clotting and prevents bleeding; this is can be used to prevent post-surgery bruising.

Without these important nutrients, patients are more prone to infection and healing time can be further delayed. Researchers note that severely underweight or overweight patients, or those who take steroids, immunosuppressant, or chemotherapeutic agents may experience poor recovery after oral surgery. It is crucial to maintain a healthy balance of vitamins before going into surgery.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=N&iid=315&aid=1277

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003042208290295X

http://www.livestrong.com/article/470706-nutrition-related-to-the-oral-cavity/

Five Green Foods That Can Bring About Good Oral Health

June 4th, 2013

Have you been looking to get healthier and searching for how to change up your current diet? Here are a couple green healthy foods that can get you started on spicing up what you eat and also can be beneficial for your oral health!

Green tea: get ready to cut out sugary and carbonated beverages and look into a lighter and calming alternative. While green tea has been proven to reduce the risk of both stroke and oral cancer, it contains catechins, which are a type of antioxidants that also prevents cavities and gingivitis. Green tea also prevents halitosis by hindering bacterial growth. Make sure to read our blog to find out more about green tea health benefits!

Celery: these crunchy greens can help produce saliva, freshening up the mouth while neutralizing bacteria that results in cavities. Celery is also known to stimulate and massage gums during chewing and also cleanses areas between teeth.

Wasabi: the spicy Japanese horseradish not only adds flavor to sushi and sashimi, but can also be front line defense for teeth. What makes wasabi taste hot is a substance known as isothiocyanates, which also prevents the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Eating green paste can keep cavities away!

Parsley: these leaves can add flavor to a variety of dishes but can also help freshen up the mouth after a meal. These greens contain monoterpenes, which are substances that travel through the lungs and bloodstream; their odor ends up being released through one’s breath.

Kiwi: most fruits contain an assortment of vitamins, but kiwis are known to be jam-packed with Vitamin C, which allow maintains the collagen in gums, preventing tenderness and vulnerability to bacteria. Snacking on these sweet green fruits is another way to prevent cavities.

If you have any more questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/26/health/it-works-on-sushi-it-could-help-teeth-too.html

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/getting-your-vitamin-c-from-kiwi-fruit.html#b

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