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Sipping Soft Drinks Associated with Obesity and Tooth Wear

November 17th, 2019

We all have certain food and drink cravings. For many, sodas may be one of them. We all know soda isn't the healthiest drink choice, however, you may not have known that sodas have been associated with both tooth decay and obesity, according to new research. According to the study published in ‘Clinical Oral Investigations,’ researchers found a direct link between the amount of sugary soft drinks and the breakdown of tooth enamel. In adult study participants who had tooth wear, researchers found that the number of surfaces affected was 1.4 times higher for each additional sugary/acidic beverage per day. They also found that the number of surfaces with moderate-to-severe tooth wear was 17% lower for each additional non-sugar/non-acidic beverage the adult drank each day.

Carbonated and acidic drinks can lead to enamel erosion, or tooth wear, which can have a negative impact on your oral health. Once the tooth enamel becomes worn down, the shape and appearance of the teeth can begin to change. The layer beneath tooth enamel, known as dentin, also begins to show and you may begin experiencing tooth sensitivity to  cold or hot foods and beverages. This can lead to many extra costly dental procedures down the road. Plus, acidic beverages are also known to increase the risk of gastric reflux disease in people who are overweight. So, not only are these drinks causing harm to your teeth, they are also damaging your body. The good news is, tooth wear can be preventable!

Diet is important for your overall health and pearly whites. Be sure to choose healthier drink alternatives. If you are to indulge in soda, do so in moderation and be sure to drink plenty of water afterwards to dilute the acid and sugar. Using a straw when consuming acidic beverages is also helpful to keep the sugar away from sitting on your teeth. Not to mention, ever heard of the slogan, "sip all day, get decay?" The statement is true! Sipping on soda throughout the day for long p periods of time can quickly breakdown your teeth, as the acid attacks your enamel with each sip of soda you take. Be sure to engage in physical activity each day and keep up with good oral hygiene practices.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028075946.htm

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What's in Your Candy Bowl?

October 31st, 2019

Here at WDG, we wish you a happy, safe, and tooth-friendly Halloween! It's hard not to love candy, especially when there's so much of it around like during Halloween. Most of us have a "sweet-tooth," but we all know sometimes this can come at a cost to our dental health. Tooth decay can develop as the sugars from candy breakdown your tooth enamel.
Today lots of candy will be collected from house to house, and most of the time children will have a collection of all types of candy within their bags. But, did you know that all candies are not created equal? There are some candies that are worse for your oral health than others. Take a look at what candies should be avoided:

Sour Patch Kids

Sour Patch Kids are loaded with sugar. In fact, it's ingredients all contain sugar and acids that are harmful to your teeth, including corn syrup, tartaric acid, citric acid, modified corn starch, and artificial flavoring. In just a 2 ounce bag, there is about 36 grams fo sugar! Sour candies also contribute to enamel erosion due to their high acidic content.

Tootsie Rolls

As you may know, sticky candies like tootsie rolls have a hard time being removed from the pits and grooves on your teeth. This allows bacteria to make themselves at home and produce acids that contribute to tooth decay. Not to mention, even though they're small, they're packed with sugar. In 6 tootsie rolls there is about 20 grams of sugar.

Caramel

Caramel can be another sticky issue. Its ingredients include glucose syrup, sugar and cane sugar syrup for a total of 16 grams of sugar for 6 tiny pieces.

Candy corn

Candy corn is a Halloween staple. However, it can contain more sugar than ice-cream and is another sticky culprit that your teeth will benefit from not having.

Jawbreakers

The name itself is terrifying, and true. Hard candies, such as jawbreakers can cause extreme jaw pain and even lead to cracked teeth. They also last a long period of time within the mouth which exposes your teeth to harmful sugars for the lengthy periods.

Fun Dip

The assortment of colors and sweet taste of fun dip can be cool, but it is essentially made up of 100% sugar and can be detrimental to your pearly-whites.

Snickers

The chocolate and caramel goodness can be not so sweet for your teeth despite the high sugar content. It's another sticky treat, and contains 27 grams of sugar, and contains 266 calories.

But not to worry, once done sorting from the huge candy pile collected today, our Annual Candy Drive is a great way to share extra Halloween candy for a great cause. We will send all donations and caring messages to our U.S. troops overseas to express our gratitude for their service. Any school, organization, or individual is welcome to participate. We also award a grand prize of $1000 to the school PTO that donated the most candy, taking into account the number of students per school and amount of pounds of candy collected per student. Please join us for the upcoming grand celebration this year:

Candy Collection: 1st-7th November 2019Press Event: 8th November, 2019 @ 10 AMLocation: 5 Seaward Rd, Wellesley, MA 02481

If you have questions or queries about how you can join hands with us for this great cause, send us an email at candydrive@wellesleydentalgroup.com, or call us at 781-237-9071. This year you can also register online!

RSVP: https://forms.gle/WdvFhU9UoM6RU2fR7

Be sure to follow us on Twitter,  LinkedIn, and Facebook, and look for updates on our Facebook Event Page.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

http://www.dentalproductsreport.com/dental/article/8-candies-make-dental-professionals-scream?page=0,8

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Halloween Do's and Don'ts!

October 26th, 2019

Halloween is quickly approaching, and the last thing anyone wants to be haunted by is cavities! Halloween can be a great time to promote good oral health habits for life, even with the temptation of sweet treats around for the occasion. What many people may not know is that the frequency of snacking on foods high in sugar, like candy, is more harmful to your teeth than the actual amount of sugar present in the snack. The amount of time the sugar is present on your teeth leads to a greater number of acid attacks on your teeth, eventually resulting in tooth decay. So, to prevent being spooked by cavities, here's a few suggestions to keep your teeth strong and healthy this Halloween:

Pass out sugar-free treats

A great way to promote healthy teeth to your little ones is to pass out tooth-friendly Halloween treats during this trick-or-treat season. Passing out glow-in-the dark stick bracelets and necklaces are fun and nice for trick-or-treaters so that they can shine as they walk through neighborhoods collecting treats. Small water bottles are also useful for the kids to drink after they consume their candy treats while going from house to house. Also, sugar-free gum with xylitol, stickers, and even toothbrushes make for great gifts that can be passed out during Halloween!

 

Timing is Everything!

Halloween candy is best eaten with meals or not too long after mealtime when saliva production is at its highest. Saliva helps wash away the acids made by bacteria as well as any leftover food particles within the mouth. Water also is important to swish with after indulging in sweets. 

Donate some of your treats to WDG's 12th Annual Candy Drive:

Our Annual Candy Drive is a great way to share extra Halloween candy for a great cause. We will send all donations and caring messages to our U.S. troops overseas to express our gratitude for their service. Any school, organization, or individual is welcome to participate. We also award a grand prize of $1000 to the school PTO that donated the most candy, taking into account the number of students per school and amount of pounds of candy collected per student. Please join us for the upcoming grand celebration this year:
Candy Collection: 1st-7th November 2019Press Event: 8th November, 2019 @ 10 AMLocation: 5 Seaward Rd, Wellesley, MA 02481

If you have questions or queries about how you can join hands with us for this great cause, send us an email at candydrive@wellesleydentalgroup.com, or call us at 781-237-9071. This year you can also register online!

RSVP: https://forms.gle/WdvFhU9UoM6RU2fR7

Be sure to follow us on Twitter,  LinkedIn, and Facebook, and look for updates on our Facebook Event Page.

Avoid sticky situations:

Sticky and sour candies can do a number on your teeth more than other candies. Sticky candies can get stuck in the grooves of teeth and remain their for long periods of time and increase your risk of developing cavities. Also, sour candies often are more acidic and can break down your tooth enamel. 

We wish you all a happy, safe, and cavity-free Halloween!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/non-candy-halloween-treats

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Healthy Start to the School Year

August 21st, 2019

Sometimes we often forget just how important our food choices are for our bodies. Especially when we are craving that most-delicious sweet that we all cannot resist! Things like candy and soda both typically fill our hearts desires, but as we all know they’re not on our good side. But, we truly do need to be more careful about what we eat, not only for your health but also for your pearly whites. Now that summer is soon coming to an end and school is approaching, it’s important to review what should be included on you and your child’s plate. Take a look at these healthy foods that can help satisfy your taste, and keep your mind, body, and teeth in good shape!

Dairy

Dairy products like cheese, milk, and yogurt make great tooth-friendly snacks. Cheese can help lower the risk of tooth decay by raising the pH, making the mouth less acidic. Not to mention, dairy is often full of protein and nutrients that help keep your enamel strong, like calcium. Yogurt contains healthy bacteria, also known as probiotics, which are known to help with digestion and fight off bad bacteria. Dairy is also typically low in sugar, making it a great pick for your lunch.

Nuts

 

Nuts are low in sugar, and are full of protein and minerals that are great for your overall health. Plus, chewing nuts helps trigger saliva production, which can lower your risk for tooth decay. Try tossing them in salads, or grab a bag of them to add to your lunchbox.

 

Hight Fiber Foods/Vegetables

Foods high in fiber such as leafy greens are the way to go when looking for something healthy! It aids digestion, promotes good cholesterol levels, and enhances saliva production necessary for protecting your teeth. Not only are they low in calories, but they're also loaded with vitamins and minerals.

Water

Staying hydrated with water, particularly fluoridated water, is key for keeping your body healthy. Fluoride is an important component as it helps remineralize tooth enamel and makes teeth more resistant to decay.

Apples

An apple a day can actually be good for your health and smile! Apples contain a great amount of fiber and water, and help act similarly to a toothbrush by helping to remove food particles from your teeth.

Carrots

Crunchy carrots also help stimulate saliva production and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A. They make a great snack by themselves or added to salad.

Cranberries

Cranberries have been found to protect your smile by helping keep plaque from sticking to teeth with the help of polyphenols.

Sugarless gum

For all of the gum lovers, sugar-free gum is the best option for your pearly whites. Chewing sugarless gum helps increase saliva production and helps wash away leftover food particles that bacteria feed on.

Prevention is the best way to keep your body and smile in tip-top shape. One method of prevention is to carefully choose healthy foods full of essential nutrients.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/healthy-foods-list-seven-best-foods-for-your-teeth-0214

https://www.livescience.com/44111-foods-healthy-teeth-bad-breath.html

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My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

April 17th, 2019

It's that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that's not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children's teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here's how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

A recent study analyzing 40 children with asthma looked at the prevalence of dental cavities, gingival bleeding, the pH of saliva, composition of bacteria within the mouth, in addition to assessing their oral hygiene habits. It was found that the children with asthma experienced dry mouth, had at least 5-8 cavities, and a rapid formation of plaque. The children also had an increased acidity of pH within the mouth, which puts them at a higher risk of cavities and the fungal infection, candidiasis. Another study reported that individuals with asthma had approximately a 19% increased risk of suffering from periodontitis.

Fortunately, avoiding gum disease can be achieved by practicing proper oral hygiene techniques, including using a fluoride toothpaste, mouth rinse, brushing and flossing regularly, and making regular visits to the dentist. If you notice red puffy gums, bleeding with brushing or flossing, or persistent bad breath, these can be early signs of gum disease.  It is also important to always bring your inhaler to dental and medical appointments to ensure your safety in the case of an acute asthma attack.

The Effect of Asthma Medications

The medications taken to combat asthma also play a role in negatively impacting the oral cavity. This is because the protective mucous membrane within the mouth is less effective/reduced in individuals with asthma, lowering the body's immune system. Dry mouth is a major consequence of many medications, which allows for plaque build-up and bacteria accumulation that contribute to dental cavities, bad breath, and gum disease.

Inhaled corticosteroids, including Advair and Azmacort, may cause oral thrush, dental cavities, oral ulcers, and hoarseness. In addition, Albuterol, a medication used to treat bronchospasm, can have side effects including oral thrush, dry mouth, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, throat irritation, and nausea.

Tips for Managing Oral Health with Asthma

  • Rinsing with water after you using your inhaler can help avoid developing an oral fungal infection.
  • Stay hydrated in order to help combat dry mouth.
  • Keep your dentist informed about your medications and medical conditions. Make sure your dentist knows if you have asthma and what medications you are taking so that your health can be managed properly.
  • Manage allergies. Both asthma and allergies typically flare-up together. Managing both properly can help prevent mouth-breathing and dry mouth.
  • Practice good dental hygiene.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/asthma-found-to-increase-the-likelihood-of-gum-disease-by-a-fifth

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html

http://www.thetotaldentistry.com/2018-07-dental-caries-in-asthmatic-children/

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Should you be Tongue Scraping?

March 28th, 2019

As you walk down the oral hygiene isle at your local drug store and see the limitless brands of toothpastes, mouthwashes, and toothbrushes, you may have noticed an item labeled tongue scraper. You may be wondering, “Is it really necessary to brush my tongue?” According to evidence based research, yes it's necessary! Bacteria, dead cells, leftover food debris, and toxins can accumulate on your tongue overtime, which can contribute to bad breath, also known as halitosis. By the end of the day you may notice a thick film coating on your tongue that often ranges in color from clear, white, yellow, or green. According to research, around 85% of all halitosis cases originate from bacteria within the mouth, and a surprising 50% are caused by the debris leftover on the tongue.

Read on to learn about the benefits of tongue scraping for maintaining your oral health:

The good news is, tongue scrapers can quickly and efficiently remove extra particles from the surface of your tongue. They are inexpensive and can be found at many drug stores or online sites. They can be made of plastic or different metals (copper, stainless steel), both effective in removing debris from the tongue. However, plastic tongue scrapers are typically cheaper but may not last as long.

Your tongue can also be cleaned with a regular toothbrush, however, research has reported that a tongue scraper is more effective at removing volatile sulfur compounds, the common culprits of causing bad breath, from the tongue than using just a soft-bristled toothbrush on the tongue. So, after brushing the surfaces of your teeth with a toothbrush and flossing, add a tongue scraper to your morning and evening oral hygiene routine to help enhance your dental health.

Here's how tongue scraping can positively impact your oral health:

  1. Tongue scraping can help eliminate bad breath

  • Bad breath is never fun to deal with, and can take a toll on a person’s relationships and self-esteem. In addition to brushing your teeth, tongue scraping has been found to remove the oral bacteria that typically causes bad breath.
  1. Tongue scraping benefits your taste buds

  • The build up of debris often leads to taste buds becoming less effective. By removing the debris from the tongue, you are better able to taste bitter, sweet, salty, and sour sensations.
  1. Help boost your immunity

  • Tongue scraping can help prevent toxins from being reabsorbed into your body and help improve your immune system. It has been found to lower the presence of Strep. Mutans and Lactobacilli bacteria, which are known to cause tooth decay and bad breath.
  1. Improve the appearance of your tongue

  • Sometimes the buildup of debris can cause your tongue to have a white coating, which tongue scraping can help remove and restore your tongue back to its normal pink color.

 

To perform tongue scraping, stick your tongue out and place the tongue scraper at the back of your tongue and gently scrape forward along the surfaces of your tongue as often as needed. One to two scrapes in the same area typically suffices. After each scrape, you can use a water or tissue to remove the debris from the scraper. Try to avoid placing the tongue scraper too far back to prevent stimulating a gag reflex. Also be mindful of how much pressure you are applying when tongue scraping. Be sure to use gentle strokes to avoid causing any harm. The entire process typically takes less than 2 minutes and can be done throughout the day, especially after meals is a great time.

Be sure you are keeping up with brushing at least twice a day for at least two minutes, flossing at least once a day to remove plaque and food particles from hard to reach areas in-between teeth, and keeping up with regular dental visits. It is important to drink a lot of water, which will not only help prevent dry mouth, but also help eliminate bad breath.

If you notice any white patches in your mouth or unusual discoloration, bumps, or sores, be sure to let your dentist know so that it can be evaluated. This may be a sign of oral thrush or other conditions such as those pictured below, which can be managed under your dentist’s supervision.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tongue-scrapers

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/tongue-scraping

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15341360

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bad-breath/expert-answers/tongue-scraper/faq-20057795

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Each Bite Counts: National Nutrition Month

March 10th, 2019

The popular saying, "You are what you eat," reminds us that a healthy diet is important in order to keep our bodies healthy, vibrant, and energized. National Nutrition Month is a yearly initiative each March created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to educate individuals on healthy food choices. What we eat on a daily basis not only effects our general health, but also the health of our teeth and gums. In fact, the initial signs of poor nutrition can often first be seen in the mouth.

Healthy teeth aren't just a result of daily toothbrushing and flossing...nutrition plays a major role, too! It is important to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups.

Here are some tips to help you make informed choices on foods and beverages that are tooth-friendly and heart-healthy:

  • Be sure to educate your children about the benefits of eating smart and keeping hydrated with milk and water over sugary sodas and sports drinks. If consuming acidic foods or beverages, it is best to drink water immediately, but wait 30 minutes before brushing your teeth to avoid damaging your enamel since it is at a weakened state during this period. If you have an infant, only send them to sleep with water, as milk or juice can lead to baby bottle tooth decay.
  • Find out your nutritional and calorie needs, based on your age, gender, amount of physical activity, and other health factors. A balanced diet should include:
    • Fruits and Vegetables
      • Fruits and vegetables contain a high water and fiber content, which is beneficial for your teeth and body.
    • Whole Grains
      • Whole wheat bread
      • Brown rice
      • Oatmeal
    • Dairy (low-fat or fat-free)
      • Cheese, milk, and plain yogurt help keep your pearly whites strong!
    • Protein
      • Lean beef
      • Skinless poultry and fish
      • Eggs
      • Beans
      • Peas
      • Legumes

  • Avoid foods that harm your dental health, including empty calorie foods like candy, sweet desserts and non-nutritional snacks. Foods and drinks high in sugar, starch, and carbohydrates, stick to tooth enamel and the bacteria within your mouth consume the sugar. In return the bacteria then release harmful acid that breaks down tooth enamel. It is best to limit your consumption of soda, juice, and sweetened coffee or tea, as these choices promote tooth decay. Not to mention, coffee, tea, and wine are big culprits of causing tooth staining.
  • Nutrients including phosphorus, calcium, Vitamin D, and probiotics, help strengthen enamel and fight against tooth decay. Also, Vitamin C , found in citrus fruits, tomatoes, peppers, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes to name a few, helps promote gum health.
  • Snacking between meals can expose your teeth to more sugar and acids, so it is best to limit snacking. If you do snack, make a conscious nutritious choice, such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables, or nuts.
  • In addition to eating healthy, make sure you are staying physically active for at least 1 hour a day.
  • If you have medical conditions including gastrointestinal reflux or an eating disorder, your risk of cavities and enamel erosion may be higher.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/national-nutrition-month

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/ada-march-is-national-nutrition-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=nutrition-month

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How Does Your Cold/Flu Affect Your Mouth?

January 6th, 2019

Catching a cold or the flu can be one of the worst things that come with the cold weather during winter. The (CDC) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that adults typically get a cold 2-3 times a year! A lot of challenges come with being sick, including trouble sleeping, eating, and just going about your normal daily activities. With a sore throat, stuffy or runny nose, and a box of tissues by your side, you may be looking to cough medicine and nasal decongestants to hide the symptoms. But, did you ever wonder how your cold or the medicines to treat them impact your teeth and mouth?  Here's some things to keep in mind in order to keep your body and mouth healthy while combatting a cold:

Stuffy Nose & Dry Mouth

It's a real struggle when you cannot breathe through your nose, especially when you're trying to get a good night's rest. As a result, you have to breathe through your mouth, which can cause you to experience dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is less saliva flow, which can also occur from taking nasal decongestants like sudafed to remedy your stuffy nose. Unfortunately, dry mouth not only makes it hard to swallow, it can also impact your mouth by promoting bacterial growth. So, when taking nasal decongestants to help your cold, stay hydrated with water and chewing xylitol-containing gum can help stimulate saliva flow. You can also try using a humidifier in the room you sleep in.

Sinus & Tooth Pain 

Another obstacle that you may face as a result of being sick is tenderness and pain around your sinuses as a result of sinusitis. This can cause you to feel like you have a toothache in your upper jaw since they are near your sinuses. Some signs of sinusitis include a yellow colored mucous drainage, and pressure near your mid-face. Fortunately, this experience should improve once your cold clears up.

Cough Drops/Syrup & Throat Lozenges

Here's the scoop on cough syrup, cough drops and sore throat lozenges:  most of the time these products contain sugar for flavor and can be damaging to your teeth as they are held in your mouth for long periods of time. Not to mention, cough syrups are sticky and can remain on teeth and cause harm to your enamel. Try to look for pills, sugar-free cough drops, and sore throat lozenges as these are best for your oral health! Be sure to also keep your regular oral care routine brushing, flossing, and rinsing.

Orange Juice

Orange juice is loaded with vitamin C to help your immune system fight your cold. Due to the acidity which can weaken your tooth enamel, try drinking orange juice in one sitting during a meal, and drink water afterwards to help protect your tooth from the acid.

As you fight a cold/flu keep your dental health in mind and replace your toothbrush once you feel better so you can start fresh!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/dry-mouth/how-the-common-cold-teeth-and-oral-health-are-connected-1215

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Merry and Bright Teeth for the Holidays!

December 21st, 2018

As the holidays approach, your dentist and teeth may not be high on your list of things to think about. But, it's important to keep your oral health in mind so that you can enter 2019 with a healthy start! Take a look at these tips so that you can enjoy the holidays while keeping your teeth and gums healthy and bright:

1. Don't forget your oral health routine

Be sure to keep up your routine of brushing at least twice a day for two minutes, rinsing, and flossing. If you're looking for stocking stuffer ideas, toothbrushes are a great option! Toothbrushes should be replaced once the bristles look worn or approximately every 3 to 4 months. When looking for toothpaste, make sure to buy toothpaste with the ADA Seal of Acceptance and fluoride to help prevent cavities. Also, if your due for your dental visit make sure to schedule!

2. Protect your teeth

It may be tempting to use your teeth for situations other than chewing and speaking. You may get the urge to bite your nails to relieve stress, or use your teeth to open packages or bottles, but avoid using your teeth as tools at all costs! Be sure to grab scissors or a bottle opener instead of your teeth. Poor habits can lead to jaw problems, facial pain, sensitive teeth, and can even lead to cracked or loss of teeth.

3. Stay hydrated

Keep water by your side during the holidays and avoid sodas, juices, and sports drinks as they contain high amounts of sugar and create acids that can weaken your tooth enamel. Water with fluoride in it can keep your teeth strong, which is particularly important as you may be indulging in sweet holiday treats! Drinking water can also help keep skin healthy and glowing, and help eliminate bad breath.

4. Avoid chewing hard candies or ice cubes

The sugar in hard candies is just one thing to worry about. Crunching on hard candy can cause chipped or cracked teeth. Also avoid chewing on ice cubes as they could cause chipped teeth or cold sensitivity. Instead, let the ice dissolve naturally and try to stay away from hard or sticky candies that can weaken your tooth enamel.

 

It may not be easy to stay away from sweets and goodies during the holiday, but try your best to keep your teeth a priority!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids/holiday-healthy-teeth-tips

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Will Your Teeth Thank You This Thanksgiving?

November 22nd, 2018

Today’s the long awaited day for gathering with family and friends for a day of feasting and possibly even football. We would like to wish you and your family a safe and happy Thanksgiving from our caring team at Wellesley Dental Group. Thanksgiving day has been a tradition dating back to 1621 in celebration of the Pilgrims’ first harvest. Most people will be focused on the delicious and flavorful assortment of foods without thinking about the feast certain bacteria within the mouth will be having that can impact teeth. Not all foods are created equally when it comes to your oral health, so here’s what you need to know to have a tooth-friendly holiday:

Turkey:

The star of the holiday is the tasty turkey, which luckily is full of protein. Our body relies on protein to help build and heal tissues. Be sure to have some floss ready though, it's easy for turkey to get stuck in-between teeth and cause harm to your teeth.

Cranberry Sauce:

The Thanksgiving turkey is often accompanied by cranberry sauce.  Normally, cranberries have been found to fight against Streptococcus Mutans (S. mutans), the bacteria primarily involved in causing cavities. However, when sugar is added to create this tasty side dish, the stickiness and acidity can damage your teeth. Be sure to brush and floss once you've recovered from your
Thanksgiving meal!

Macaroni & Cheese:

There's good and bad news to this dish. Dairy products including milk and cheese which are found in this recipe provide calcium which helps strengthen tooth enamel. Yet, starches like white pasta can give bacteria within the mouth a food source to thrive on and lead to the process of making cavities.

Pumpkin Pie:

Pumpkins are rich in Vitamin A, which is good for strengthening tooth enamel. But, pies and whipped cream toppings typically contain a lot of added sugar which are not so good for your enamel. Eating desserts shortly after meal time is best to ensure that saliva is flowing to wash away any leftover sweets.

Wine:

Good news! Red wine has been found to have ingredients that fight cavities by blocking S. mutans.

Mashed Potatoes and Gravy:

Mashed potatoes are loaded with vitamin C, B6 and potassium, which our diets require. Unfortunately for our teeth, potatoes and gravy contain starch for bacteria to feed off of making it not so tooth-friendly.

Sweet Potatoes:

This dish can be tooth-friendly, but it depends on how it is prepared. Sweet potatoes naturally contain vitamins A and C, which are beneficial for keeping teeth healthy. However, the famous candied yam recipe that has most of our mouths watering often calls for marshmallows that can stick to teeth and breakdown tooth enamel.

So, overall, be sure to drink a lot of water with your Thanksgiving feast to wash away any sticky foods, and remember to brush and floss to keep your smile healthy after the holidays. Most of all, enjoy your meal and time spent with loved ones!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/thanksgiving-slideshow

https://www.idahostatejournal.com/news/local/is-your-thanksgiving-feast-good-for-your-teeth/article_652a7693-8abc-5216-8c0a-bffbdb738795.html

https://www.gustotv.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Jamie-Oliver’s-biggest-tips-on-how-to-make-a-foolproof-Thanksgiving-dinner-479x269.jpg

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e73344b9cdfdedc315f380c25d0c9e89cdad696f

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red-wine.jpg

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Am I Using the Right Toothpaste?

August 20th, 2018

Do you ever get overwhelmed by the limitless types of toothpaste on the shelves at a store? From natural fluoride-free toothpastes to those that contain fluoride, it can be hard to know which one you should choose. Fluoride is known to play an important a role in preventing cavities and is naturally found within community water sources. So, that leaves the question: Which type of toothpaste should you be using, fluoride-free or fluoride containing toothpaste?

Some people are choosing to switch to natural fluoride-free toothpaste because they've heard about the potential side effects of Fluoride. Global Healing Center notes that those side effects include arthritis, female puberty acceleration, kidney health, toxic to the thyroid, and adverse cognitive effects. Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening Fluoride-Free Toothpaste is a particularly popular brand that people are switching to. However, even Tom’s of Maine brand manager notes that the company’s fluoride-free products don't promise to protect your teeth from tooth decay.

With more research needed to be done, it's still not certain whether or not fluoride-free toothpaste works. Some dentists argue that brushing and flossing the excess plaque off the teeth can help prevent tooth decay. Yet, other dentists say that the components within the toothpaste, such as fluoride are what's mainly preventing tooth decay.

 So, what should you use? If you have a child  that is less than two years old, the American Dental Association recommends that they should not be using a fluoride toothpaste because they are in danger of swallowing too much fluoride. Consuming too much fluoride can cause dental fluorosis, which can cause brown spots on teeth or pitting. Also, avoid fluoride-containing tooth paste if you are allergic to fluoride. Fluoride intake  in the correct amount is important for adults, and infants and children ages 6 months to 16 years, when primary and permanent teeth are developing. Fluoride-containing toothpastes are recommended to help prevent tooth decay.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

tooth-brushing.jpeg

https://www.cheatsheet.com/health-fitness/does-fluoride-free-toothpaste-work.html/

Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?

August 8th, 2018

 

As sparkling water becomes more popular, there's one question that comes into play when thinking about your oral health: Is the crisp and refreshing fizz of sparkling water healthy for your teeth? You may be wondering what the issue could be with sparking water, especially since most brands are sugar-free. However, carbonated drinks like sparkling water contain carbon dioxide, which turns into carbonic acid once in the mouth. This lowers the pH level and thus causes the mouth to become a more acidic environment. Some researchers have concerns about whether or not sipping sparkling water could lead to tooth decay due to erosion of the tooth enamel.

What do researchers say about Sparkling Water?

Current research has found that sparkling water in comparison to highly acidic beverages (for example, sports drinks) are much less erosive to teeth. In fact, the ADA states that it has a comparable effect on tooth enamel as ordinary non-carbonated water. Therefore, sparkling water is generally okay for your teeth, but it is recommended that you not substitute regular fluoridated water with sparkling water.Image result for sparkling water

Tips to help protect your teeth

  • Sparkling water is indeed less acidic and much better for your teeth than sugary drinks such as soda and sports drinks. Yet, it is important to also drink regular fluoridated water in order to keep your teeth strong and healthy. Fluoride helps remineralize tooth enamel and helps fight tooth decay.
  • Beware: some sparkling waters contain sugar which add to your risk of tooth decay.
  • Avoid sipping on sparkling water throughout the day, but rather drink it down with a meal/in one sitting in order to lower the amount of exposure to the carbonation. Also avoid adding acidic fruits like limes or lemons which can also lower the pH and increase the risk of enamel erosion. Enamel erosion can cause tooth sensitivity and discoloration due to the layer of dentin being exposed.

So, if you can, avoid sipping on acidic drinks throughout the day. Regular fluoridated water is often the best choice to keep your teeth healthy and mouth at a neutral pH!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips/the-truth-about-sparkling-water-and-your-teeth?source=promospots&content=rotator&medium=sparkling_water

https://www.today.com/food/difference-between-seltzer-sparkling-water-club-soda-tonic-water-t114161

https://draxe.com/sparkling-water/

Protect Your Smile in the Cold!

January 8th, 2017

Baby, it's cold outside! Since having healthy teeth is important for self-confidence and the prevention of diseases or pains (such as canker sores or cold sores), we need to make sure to take care of our teeth as the temperatures drop. This is especially important if your teeth are sensitive.

If you have sensitive teeth in cold weather, it may be due to several reasons. For instance, you could have cracked teeth, weakened enamel, gum recession, gingivitis, or an infection. Make sure not to brush too hard or clench or grind your teeth, because these habits could make your teeth even more sensitive.

However, teeth sensitivity problems can be easily resolved. Just maintain proper oral hygiene habits and make an effort to protect your teeth! Brush with a soft toothbrush after meals, floss, and use densensitizing toothpaste.

Maintaining a healthy diet and staying hydrated is just as important. Drink at least two liters of water per day to ensure moist gums and teeth and adequate saliva production (and don't forget to apply a lip balm to avoid cracked lips!). Avoid beverages with high sugar content and acidic foods.

If you can, try to limit your time outside as well. Sudden changes in temperature can result in the formation of teeth fractures, so if you have to be outside, wear a scarf and cover your mouth!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.imgion.com/images/01/Playing-in-Winter-.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/mouth-sores-and-infections/article/winter-tips-for-a-healthy-mouth-dealing-with-common-winter-mouth-woes-0115

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rahis-saifi/5-dental-health-tips-on-h_b_12457368.html?utm_hp_ref=dental-health

Drink More Water!

October 17th, 2016

Looking for a cheap and easy way to improve your well-being and oral health at the same time? The solution to staying healthy can be as simple as drinking more water every day.

A recent study published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics that studied the dietary habits of over 18, 000 adults in the U.S. provided evidence that most people who increased their intake of plain water (tap water, water from a drinking fountain, bottled water, etc.) by one percent decreased their intakes of sugar, sodium, saturated fat, cholesterol, and daily calorie intake. Drinking more water especially benefits those who wish to control their weight.

In addition to overall health benefits, an increase in water intake also prevents dry mouth (xerostomia), a condition that results when there is a lack of saliva to keep your mouth wet and moisturized. Some symptoms of dry mouth include bad breath, mouth sores, a burning or dry sensation in the mouth, tongue, and throat, cracked lips, and gum irritation. By drinking more water, you can minimize and relieve dry mouth.

If you need another reason to increase your water intake, tap water is especially beneficial for your oral health. Tap water often contains fluoride, which prevents tooth decay in a safe, natural, and effective way.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://ottmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/health-benefits-of-drinking-water-1.jpg

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160301174759.htm

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/dry-mouth

http://www.ada.org/en/public-programs/advocating-for-the-public/fluoride-and-fluoridation

Oral Health Is Still Important After 50!

October 1st, 2016

senior-couple-brushing-teeth

Unlike wine, teeth don't always get finer with age! However, with all the advanced technology we have today, it's not uncommon for older adults to keep their natural teeth by maintaining their oral health with a proper hygiene routine and a healthy diet.

Here are some tips you can follow to ensure a healthy smile:

  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste at least two times a day to decrease your risk for cavities
  • Use a soft toothbrush to prevent wearing down gum tissue and sensitive areas
  • Floss and use interdental cleaners regularly to clean areas your toothbrush can't reach
  • Keep making appointments with your dentist

If you suffer from xerostomia (dry mouth), a side effect of some medications, make sure to drink plenty of water, chew sugar-free gum, or use oral moisturizers so you're less likely to get cavities or gum disease.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.senior1care.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/senior-couple-brushing-teeth.jpg

http://www.caledonianrecord.com/features/health/dental-health-after/article_1d46046d-d02f-5e38-bf1b-331ca73bafa7.html

http://seniorsoralhealth.org/?doing_wp_cron=1473121507.1317451000213623046875

Why Sports Drinks Shouldn't be a Social Norm

August 23rd, 2016

sports

As we all know, exercise is necessary for maintaining a healthy body. It's important to make sure our youth are staying active and getting their daily dose of exercise. However, children who play sports often turn to readily available sports drinks including Gatorade, Powerade, and Vitamin Water to quench their thirst after a hard workout. In addition, now research has found that an increasing amount of 12-14 year olds drink sports drinks just for social reasons. According to a survey conducted by Cardiff University School of Dentistry, individuals who drink sports drinks, whether after exercising or just for fun, increase their risk of obesity and tooth decay.

The study involved 160 children in four schools across South Wales and found that children are increasingly consuming sports drinks because of their low price, sweet taste, and availability. Approximately 80 of the children reported that they drink sports drinks socially, whereas only 18% said they drink them due to the advertised performance enhancing effect.

Unfortunately, many parents and children do not know the health dangers of consuming sports drinks. These drinks contain a high amount of sugar and a low pH level, making the drinks highly acidic leading to an increased risk of obesity, cavities, and enamel erosion. The Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (FSEM) is trying create harsher regulations for the marketing of sports drinks, particularly in areas around schools.

Instead of opting for sports drinks, water is the best option for both children and adults to choose when hydrating. It will protect your dental health and overall health in the long run!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160627095627.htm

http://www.atlantismagazine.net/images/dehydration-in-summer-1.gif

Fruit Juices and Smoothies Can Harm Your Teeth!

April 19th, 2016

Now that it finally feels like spring with all the sunshine, you might think that it's a great time to enjoy some fresh fruit juices and smoothies. They appear to be great alternatives to soda, iced tea, or other sugary drinks. However, these beverages can be harmful for your teeth and actually contain a lot of sugar according to research recently published in the online journal BMJ Open.

While the American Heart Association (AHA) suggests consuming less than 3-4 teaspoons of sugar a day for children and less than 5 teaspoons of sugar for teens, the average sugar content of pure fruit juices was 2 teaspoons and 2.5 teaspoons for smoothies. Additionally, over 40% of these drinks have 4 teaspoons of sugar!

You might think that 100% fruit juice would be better, but its innocence is deceiving. Even the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends serving no juice to infants younger than 6 months old and no more than 4 to 6 ounces to children ranging from 1 to 6 years old. Fruit juices contain free sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, and table sugar added by the manufacturer, plus natural sugars such as honey, syrups, and fruit juice concentrates), which can cause tooth decay.

Therefore, some recommendations include:

  • not eating fruit in the form of juice
  • diluting fruit juice with water
  • limiting drinking fruit juice to 5 ounces per day
  • drinking water and milk

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/308290.php

http://media1.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_32/716996/fruit-smoothies-today-tease-1-150805_f1b20de057704b0707570a6613e1f25a.jpg

Fall in Love with These Healthy Fall Foods!

October 15th, 2015

fall-foodFall is finally here! From the beautiful leaves to the abundance of pumpkin spice products, there are so many reasons to love fall. And here’s another one: your favorite fall foods can also be super beneficial for your oral health!

Here are some delicious foods that may lead to better results at your next dental appointment!

  1. Apples

You’ve probably heard the saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This saying is so well-known for a reason: this delicious fruit that comes in so many varieties has many health benefits. They have antioxidants, which can help prevent slow aging and chronic illnesses.  Furthermore, quercetin, a compound that is found in the skin of apples, can reduce risks of cancer, heart attacks, and asthma attacks. Apples have plenty of water in them, which does wonders for your teeth because water stimulates production of saliva. They also help wash food and neutralize acids from the surfaces of your teeth. The crunch in apples even helps remove dental plaque by loosening particles of food between teeth.

 

  1. Bone Broth

Everybody loves a good soup full of vegetables, broth, herbs, and spices. Bone broth is great for your immune system and digestive system. It’s also packed with calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium, which all do wonders for your teeth.

 

  1. Fish

If you love eating fish, you’re in luck. According to the Journal of Dietetic Association, fish oil can help fight gum disease. Salmon is especially beneficial for your teeth, because it can treat and prevent periodontitis.

 

  1. Cranberries

Best enjoyed October through November, cranberries not only ward off urinary tract infections, but they also restrain cancer growth and prevent oral diseases. 

 

  1. Pumpkins and Squash

Nutritionists at the National Institute of Health claim that foods rich in carotenoids, such as pumpkins and squash, can lower the risk of certain types of cancer. Pumpkins can also lead to healthy vision and cell growth, because they are great sources of alpha- and beta-carotene . Their seeds contain alpha-linolenic acid, which controls heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

If you’re craving dessert, try pumpkin pie (without the crust, which is high in fat and cholesterol). This classic fall treat contains a ton of vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, and iron. The boost of iron will keep you away from tooth decay and tongue inflammation. Pumpkin spice, a combination of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves, is also especially beneficial for your health. These spices all have phytonutrients, which are anti-inflammatory plant compounds that promote healing in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Cloves fight cancer and blood clots, but they are also used for oral health. They have anaesthetic and antibacterial properties, which can relieve toothache and infections.

 

  1. Raw Dairy

Raw dairy (raw milk, cheese, butter, yogurt) that isn’t pasteurized or homogenized is a great source of calcium, which prevents tooth decay and gum disease.

 

  1. Green Tea

Containing natural catechins, green tea reduces plaque and by destroying plaque-causing bacteria. Enjoy a cup, but don’t forget to chew sugar-free gum afterwards to avoid teeth staining.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/oral-care-tips-and-advice/best-nutritious-fall-foods-20798/

http://greatist.com/health/healthiest-fruits-and-vegetables-fall

http://www.myprimetimenews.com/spice-it-up-for-fall/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17296290

http://naturallysavvy.com/care/dental-care-the-benefits-of-cloves

http://realfoodreallocalinstitute.org/huntington-wva/wp-content/uploads/sites/9/2013/10/fall-food.jpg

Listen up, Kids: Dental Care for Children

October 9th, 2015

kidBelieve it or not, a third of children today have tooth decay before even starting school. According to statistics published by the Health & Social Care Information Centre, tooth decay is one of the main causes of hospital visits for children in elementary school. Surprisingly, 25,812 children ranging from ages 5 to 9 went to the hospital for tooth extractions in the last year alone.

Here are some tips below on how to protect your child’s teeth to make sure that your child doesn’t become part of these statistics!

  1. Drink less fruit juice!

Just because fruit juice is nutritious and often rich in vitamin C does not mean that it’s also beneficial for your teeth! Many juices have around the same amount of sugar as that in sodas, or even more. For instance, NPR states that apple juice contains 65.8 grams of sugar per liter, while cola contains 62.5 grams of sugar per liter. This copious amount of sugar leads to tooth decay. Furthermore, the acid from the juice destroys the enamel of teeth, which can cause teeth to deteriorate. Even the British Dental Association claims that 50% of children ranging from four to 18 years old show these signs.

Because of these harmful effects of fruit juice, dentists recommend water and milk as healthy beverage alternatives for children. If your child is still craving fruit juice, try to dilute it as much as possible and make sure that your child has a meal with it. Also, try your best to avoid letting your child have too much contact time with the cup and his or her teeth and instead opt for using a straw.

 

  1. Avoid dried fruit !

Dried fruit isn’t a good replacement for candy it has a great deal of sugar, and even worse, its sticky texture clings onto your child’s teeth. Due to these unhealthy properties, dried fruit can ruin enamel and rot your little one’s molars. Although chocolate isn’t a great option, dark chocolate is known to  be rich in antioxidants that help prevent the spread of tooth-decay causing bacteria.

Whole fruit can be a better option than dried fruit and fruit juice because it contains water and fibers that help wash away sugar from teeth. However, try not to feed your child more than one or two low-sugar fruit pieces (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwis, peaches, and pears) instead of high-sugar fruit pieces (grapes or pineapple) per day. Incorporate fruit into meals rather than simply having them as snacksBreadsticks, toast, cheese, nuts, or seeds are some healthier snack alternatives.

 

  1. Baby teeth matter!

It's important not to presume that just because baby teeth are not permanent, that they should not be taken care of! Your child’s permanent teeth are at a higher risk of decay and other dental problems when primary teeth decay. Baby tooth decay could lead children to experience dental anxiety, which could make them less likely to visit the dentist later on.

 

  1. Help your child brush his/her teeth!

Depending on how mature your child is, you should help brush your child’s teeth until at least age seven to ensure that they are using proper brushing techniques. 

 

  1. Proper brushing techniques!
  • Don’t let your child brush his/her teeth right after eating, particularly after eating or drinking something acidic. Doing so will brush the enamel away! Your child should either brush before eating breakfast or wait an hour after the meal. Chewing sugar-free gum can also be an effective way to clean teeth, because it produces saliva, which defends against decay, and brings mouths back to a neutral pH level.
  • It doesn’t matter if your child uses a manual or electric toothbrush. What’s important is that the brushing lasts for at least two minutes! Electric toothbrushes often have built-in timers, so this feature can be effective.
  • Don’t let your child rinse the toothpaste away right after brushing! The fluoride in the toothpaste can keep protecting his or her teeth for 30 minutes. Children under three should use toothpaste with 1,000 fluoride parts per million, while children over three should use adult toothpaste that contains 1,450 fluoride parts per million.

For many parents, the first time they took their children to the dentist was when their children were at least one year old. However, parents should set their first appointment for when their children’s teeth begin to come out, which is around five to six months old. Further oral health tips for children can be found here.

This past spring, we welcomed Dr. Van, our Pediatric Dentist, onto our caring team at the Wellesley Dental Group! Dr. Van strongly believes in the importance of creating a fun and welcoming atmosphere for patients as well as parents. One of his goals is to introduce good dental habits to our youth, preventing dental diseases later on in life.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://mouafaqbtc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/b4054a_0d4b9e685762e624649fbf8898f77c87.jpg

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/609471/Children-dental-care-truths-myths

http://www.thedentistar.com/images/import/images/glenview-kids-dentist.jpg

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/06/09/319230765/fruit-juice-vs-soda-both-beverages-pack-in-sugar-and-health-risk

When Life Gives You Lemons, Protect Your Enamel

August 30th, 2015

lemon water

Lemon water has recently been all the rage for several celebrities, and health and fitness lovers. Many individuals reportedly start their morning off with a glass of hot lemon water to cleanse their systems.

It's true, lemon water does have its own perks, including its ability to help with digestion, the immune system, and even with weight loss. Also, lemons are loaded with important nutrients, including vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and fiber. However, as refreshing as it may sound, drinking lemon water daily could cause enamel erosionUnfortunately, lemons are highly acidic, containing a pH between 2 and 3, which ultimately can lead to wear and tear on your enamel and eventually result in tooth decay. When the enamel erodes, the underlying dentin becomes exposed, which may result in painful sensitivity to hot and cold foods. Enamel erosion also makes the teeth appear hollowed and yellow. Although diluted, a daily habit of drinking lemon water can cause enamel erosion just like many other acidic foods and beverages.

Sipping on acidic beverages throughout the day should be avoided at all costs. If you do happen to find yourself drinking an acidic beverage, using a straw can help lower the chance of the liquid coming in contact with your teeth. In addition to brushing, rinsing, and flossing, chewing a piece of sugarless gum can also help get rid of the acidic residue from your teeth. Consuming dairy products and drinking water throughout the day can also help wash away acid and prevent dry mouth.

It is important not to brush your teeth immediately after drinking wine, lemon juice, or other acidic beverages due to the harmful combination of the acid and toothpaste that can soften enamel. It is recommended to rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic liquids and to wait approximately one hour before brushing your teeth.

While hot water with lemon may be a fashionable way to start the day, dentists are warning it can ruin teeth

Individuals who suffer from bulimia or acid reflux are also at a high risk of developing enamel erosion. When the stomach acid travels to the mouth, it is powerful enough to wear down the enamel on your teeth. It is necessary to get help right away.

Take your dental health into consideration when choosing what foods and beverages to include in your diet. Remember, once enamel is gone, you can't get it back! Make sure that you follow good oral health habits in order to preserve your enamel for a lifetime of healthy teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.foodworldnews.com/articles/33583/20150824/drinking-a-glass-of-water-with-lemon-every-morning-could-ruin-teeth.htm

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/11-benefits-lemon-water-you-didnt-know-about.html

http://healthnbodytips.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Benefits-of-drinking-hot-water-with-lemons.png?b0bc0c

Are Summer Foods Ruining Your Smile?

July 14th, 2015

fresh-summer-drink-wallpaper-hd

From sunny afternoons by the poolside to perfect evenings under the stars, summer is the best time to relax, be adventurous, and most importantly, to smile. Many of us also enjoy summer for the delicious foods, fruit juices, and tropical cocktails. Although a summer diet may appear healthy, there are some cravings that are harmful to your teeth that may take you by surprise.

Here are some treats that can damage your teeth and gums:

Juices sometimes contain a higher amount of sugar than soda.

Many people are aware that candy and soda can erode tooth enamel, but how about fruit drinks? Although some juices, smoothies, and cocktails contain many good nutrients, many of the drinks we consume during the summer are acidic and contain a high amount of sugar per serving. Sugars can cling to teeth and harm your pearly whites by feeding the bacteria in your mouth. This process produces acids that can sometimes irreversibly damage teeth.

As it becomes hotter, make sure to keep a glass of water by your side. Also, it is best to drink juice through a straw so that the juice has a harder time sticking to the surface of your teeth. Wait to brush your teeth at least 45-minutes after consuming sugary or acidic foods/drinks, as brushing them immediately after can leave them more susceptible to damage.

Dried Fruit

Dried fruit is often sticky and packed with sugar that can harm teeth the same way that candies do. Instead, opt for crisp apples or pears.

Chewable Vitamins

Gummy vitamins are not much better for our mouths than regular gummy candies. They often stick to the surfaces of teeth and can hide in hard-to-reach places, leading to tooth decay. It is best to take vitamins in pill form.

Popcorn

We often turn to popcorn as a snack choice, especially at the movies. Yet, popcorn is famous for getting stuck in your teeth and in areas that are hard to reach with a toothbrush. Make sure to brush and floss after consuming popcorn.

Peanut Butter and Jelly

Although a delicious and easy-to-make sandwich, peanut butter and Jelly is sticky and high in sugar content. Make sure to check nutrition labels and look for natural peanut butters and sugar-free jelly.

Salad Dressing

Salad dressings often give a nice taste to salad, but the vinegar and sugar inside the dressings can harm your smile. Avoid drenching your healthy salad with too much dressing.

Barbecue sauce

Barbecues are a great part of summer, however, the sweet barbecue sauce can cause tooth discoloration and even lead to cavities if proper oral habits are not implemented.

Vinegar with Vegetables

While the vegetables are healthy, adding vinegar, which is acidic, can harm your teeth and smile.

Wine

While red and white wine has its benefits, they also can cause trouble for your teeth. Red wine can cause staining, and the acids in white wine can damage your enamel. When consuming wine, accompany it with cheese, which is rich in nutrients including protein, calcium and phosphorus, to help fight the acids.

 

Don't fall into the sweet summer temptations that can harm your smile! There are many products sold that brand themselves as healthy products, however, sometimes the ingredients can cause damage to your teeth. It is important to remember that along with brushing, flossing, visiting the dentist, and practicing other good oral health habits, your diet plays a significant role in the health of your teeth. Make sure that your smile sparkles by monitoring the foods and drinks you consume this summer.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://time.com/3907886/teeth-damage-causes/

http://summertomato.com/10-foods-you-didnt-know-were-damaging-your-teeth/

http://wallhornet.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/fresh-summer-drink-wallpaper-hd.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summertime in the City: What's Healthy and What's Not

June 2nd, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 12.31.25 PM

June is finally here and it will be hard for many of us to resist a cold drink on a hot summer day. With the many family barbecues and outings, you're sure to be in for a treat this summer. During the warmer months, there are many tasty foods and drinks at our convenience. However, some of these items aren’t so tooth-friendly. As we all know, it is important to limit the amount of sugary foods and drinks we intake to ensure a healthy smile. For the health of your mouth, which links to your overall health, try adding these healthy options to your plate and glass this summer:

Drink, Drink, and Drink more water:

A nice glass of water can be a refreshing drink as you relax by the poolside. Water is important for staying hydrated, especially when your active and the sun is shining. Your smile will also thank you if you rinse your mouth with water after meals. Water, particularly tap water, even has the benefit of containing fluoride.

Watermelon:

Watermelon, made of 92% water, is another tasty  and healthy snack that will keep you hydrated this summer. It contains  lycopene, which helps keep skin protected. Also, many foods that are mainly composed of water have fewer calories. Your kids may even enjoy making watermelon popsicles!

Milk:

Milk is a great alternative to sugary drinks because it has been found to reduce levels of acid produced by plaque bacteria. Milk helps remineralize teeth by providing calcium to keep your teeth strong.

Sugar-Free Gum:

Chewing sugar-free gum can help to stimulate saliva flow and ultimately help to wash away left behind foods. However, it is not clear whether or not xylitol, commonly found in sugar-free gum, actually lowers the risk of developing dental cavities.

Strawberries:

Strawberries are in season and packed with healthy ingredients. Strawberries contain malic acid, which is known to whiten enamel. They also contain many antioxidants and vitamin C, which can help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, and promote eye health.

Cheese:

Cheese is full of calcium, the protein casein, and vitamin D, all good for the health of your teeth. Researchers have discovered that cheese helps increases the pH levels of dental plaque, helping to reduce tooth decay.

Pears:

Pears contain a wealth of fiber that will benefit your teeth. They help to produce saliva and lower plaque levels in the mouth.

Apples:

Crispy apples are full of vitamins and nutrients. Full of water and lots of fiber, apples help to scrub and clean the surface of your teeth.

Vegetables:

Veggies ranging from carrots rich in Vitamin A to dark leafy greens rich in iron, can make a great snack to chew on. Including vegetables in your diet is essential for the health of your teeth and body.

Cranberries:

Research has suggested that cranberries help lower the risk of cavities by helping to keep plaque from sticking to teeth. But, you may want to pay attention to the labels on cranberry products, as many of them can contain added sugars to compensate for their naturally tart flavor.

 

Some foods and drinks that are hard-to-resist, but should be avoided to keep strong and healthy teeth, include:

 

Soft Drinks, Sports Drinks, Sweet Tea, and Juice: Drinking a cold soda may sound refreshing, but it is damaging to tooth enamel. It can also dehydrate your body and make you feel more thirsty. Even sports drinks, artificially sweetened drinks, and concentrated fruit juice contain sugars for the bacteria in dental plaque to feed on and produce harmful acids. The acid then tears away at tooth enamel and can eventually lead to tooth decay. Highly acidic drinks can even cause heartburn and stomach pain. Sipping on these drinks throughout the day rather than at meal times should also be avoided because saliva production is not at its peak. Saliva is important for washing away bacteria and food particles.

Ice Cream:

The many flavors of ice cream are delicious, but unfortunately is full of sugar. Some individuals may also experience tooth sensitivity. Sensitive teeth results when the dentin underneath tooth enamel becomes exposed. This can cause pain, but can be treated. If you do have a taste for ice cream, try and select ice cream with less sugar.

Citrus Fruits:

As we all know, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruits are very acidic. These fruits contain citric acid and can be damaging to teeth if consumed frequently.

Vinegar:

A common practice, but an unhealthy one, is to mix vegetables with vinegar. This acidic combination can erode tooth enamel. Pickles are also very acidic.

Granola and Energy Bars:

These items may appear to be good for teeth, but often the dried fruit and other ingredients can be sticky, chewy, and hard to get off of teeth.

Candy: 

We all know that candy contains a lot of sugar, and should be avoided for the protection of your smile.

 

It is important to remember that if you do choose some of the not-so-healthy foods and beverages, consume them in moderation. Also, avoid snacking between meals, as acids can stick around for up to 20 minutes after eating. Not to mention, be mindful of the dyes used in many foods and beverages that can cause tooth discoloration. Practice good oral health habits and lean more towards a tooth-friendly diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/blog/fresh-breath-happenings/teeth-friendly-summer-food-ideas-34659.asp

http://greatist.com/health/healthy-teeth-foods

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-watermelon-popsicles-10713

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dwBqWs6_udQ/UBYvQhjW5TI/AAAAAAAACBY/YdNg1weBEVk/s1600/watermelon+popsicles.JPG

Does the Word "Diet" Make Soda Any Healthier?

April 2nd, 2015

You know what they all say, “Sip All Day, Get Decay!” It's not only a catchy phrase, it's the truth! There is a clear correlation between soda consumption and tooth decay, as well as to other health complications including diabetes, kidney problems, and obesity. We all are familiar with the fact that bacteria in the mouth convert sugars and carbohydrates from the foods and beverages you consume to acids, which decays tooth enamel. What's even scarier is that the acids can remain in the mouth for 20 minutes after snacking or drinking.

To avoid this reality, many turn to diet soda thinking that there will be no consequences for their teeth. You may have even been asked at one point or another, "Which is better, Diet Coke or regular Coke?" It turns out that their damaging effects on teeth are roughly the same!

What many individuals may not realize is that diet soda is still acidic, which negatively impact the health of your teeth.  Research from the Minnesota Dental Association, the Missouri Dental Association, and the University of Cincinnati Biology Department shows the pH of a regular Coke is around 2.6, which is highly acidic. On the other hand, the pH of diet coke is about 3.2. For comparison, the pH of battery acid is 1, which isn't too far off from the pH values of soda! While diet soda may not be as bad as regular soda, they do contain acids, which can cause serious damage to teeth. Phosphoric acid and citric acid is often present in many diet sodas to add flavor to the drink. These acids can demineralize and decalcify teeth. Sometimes the damage may require fillings, root canals, dental crowns, dental implantsdentures or other dental procedures.

Not to mention, many beverages use artificial flavorers and sweeteners in place of sugar for the purpose of maintaining the flavor. Although they may not contain sugar, they can make beverages acidic and can cause many problems for your teeth.

In addition to having negative oral health effects, diet soda can have a significant impact on your kidneys. According to an 11-year study at Harvard Medical School with 3,000 women participants, researchers discovered that diet cola is linked with a two-fold increased risk for kidney failure. Kidney function began to decline as women drank two or more sodas a day.

A consistent consumption of both regular and diet soda is one of the leading causes of tooth decay. Children and young adults are most prone to tooth decay because their tooth enamel is not yet fully developed. Unfortunately, many children and young adults in the United States  have decreased their intake of milk  and increased their intake of soda. In fact, according to research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, children are consuming it more than double the rate of the last 10 years. Soda consumption among adults has grown approximately 25 percent!

A healthy diet plays an important role in your overall health. It is essential to choose foods and beverages that provide vitamins and minerals for not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. Avoid giving the label, "diet or sugar-free" the same meaning as, "healthy for teeth!" You can prevent tooth decay and other health problems by staying hydrated with water and implementing good oral health habits. If you are a soda-lover, make sure to drink in moderation. Also, limit your intake of carbonated beverages, including sports drinks and juice. Most importantly, make sure that you are not substituting acidic beverages for water.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/diet/Sugar-free-drinks-Are-they-safe-for-teeth/articleshow/46515368.cms

http://www.wda.org/your-oral-health/sip-all-day

http://www.myhousecallmd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/diet-soda.jpg

Think Warm, Think Spring!

March 26th, 2015

spring

Spring break is a beloved time of year, cherished by all who are able to enjoy warmer weather, time with family, and a break from school or work. Spring break is often the first vacation of the New Year for many individuals. It’s a time when you and your family can look past the cold winter and on to sunnier days full of fun events!

Whether you and your family plan on taking a vacation outside of Massachusetts, or simply enjoying the break at home, make sure to keep up with your dental care! Taking a break from your oral health is not the way to spend spring break. Neglecting your teeth can result in poor health and lead to big oral problems, including gum disease, tooth decay, root canals, tooth sensitivity, and more.

When it comes to oral health, you can never have too many good habits. Spring Break is a great time to brush up on good oral health habits. If you and your family plan on traveling, there are several things to consider on your fun time away from home. On your vacation, make sure that you have plenty of fluids in your body. Drinking water throughout the day will not only keep your body healthy in the warmer temperatures, but also will help to eliminate plaque buildup on your teeth and teeth staining.

Travel with all of your regular oral health essentials with you in your belongings. Make sure to pack extra travel toothbrushes, toothpaste and floss in an easily accessible place. Protect your toothbrush with a toothbrush cap to keep the brush away from germs or damage in your luggage. Once you arrive, uncover your toothbrush to avoid trapping moisture and bacterial growth. Also, it is best to leave your electric toothbrush at home so that you won't have to charge it everyday! Stay on top of your oral hygiene by brushing and flossing at least twice a day to avoid dental problems from arising.

Unhealthy foods and drinks can often sneak their way into your diet on vacations. Many often change their eating habits while on vacation thinking that it will not have an effect on the health of their mouths. You may be offered soda, candy, and other culprits that are bad for teeth. Although it can be hard to say no, stay away from sugary and acidic foods as they can and will lead to an unhealthy mouth. Instead, pack healthy tooth-friendly snacks such as apples, which acts as a natural cleanser for teeth. In addition, steer clear of biting on ice cubes, no matter how hot it is during your vacation! Using teeth as tools can lead to cracked or chipped teeth.

If it's time for a cleaning, visit the dentist before the break to ensure that there are no dental concerns that need to be taken care of before vacation. A quick check up can prevent discomfort later on when the fun is happening!

If a dental emergency occurs during your vacation, such as a chipped or cracked tooth, rinse with warm water and apply pressure to the affected area. Contact the dentist at your earliest convenience.

If you're staying near Boston during the vacation, check out a few fun events that your family can enjoy:

Boston, MA 02110 1-800-987-9852 
This memorable experience involves viewing whales, dolphins, sea birds and other marine wildlife while cruising on the Voyager 3.
This tour offers a great opportunity to learn more about the various sites in MA that have contributed to American history.
Columbia Point, Boston, MA 02125
(617) 514-1600
The JFK Presidential Library celebrates the life of John Fitzgerald Kennedy and his presidency. It promotes the importance of politics and is a great family learning outing.
1 Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110
617-973-5200
Sunday - Thursday 9 am - 6 pm
Friday - Saturday 9 am - 7 pm
Explore the wonders of the deep ocean at the New England Aquarium. You can also view a show in 3D at the New England Aquarium's Simons IMAX Theatre on a 6 story tall screen!
Seaport World Trade Center, 200 Seaport Blvd #75, Boston, MA 02210
(866) 310-2469
Spend your vacation on the Spirit of Boston, which offers a fun mix of dining, dancing, and entertainment. The cruise leaves from the Seaport World Trade Center Marine Terminal.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.vacationsmadeeasy.com/BostonMA/activity/

http://www.cityofboston.gov/visitors/free.asp

http://www.1dental.com/blog/2015/03/05/dont-take-spring-break-teeth/

http://www.betcheslovethis.com/files/uploads/images/endofb.jpg

 

Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Fluoride?

January 28th, 2015

Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in water and many foods. It can also be applied to teeth through several dental products. Fluoride helps protect teeth from developing cavities by making the tooth more resistant to acids from plaque bacteria in the mouth. It also helps reverse early stages of tooth decay.

Fluoride intake is critical for infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 16 years, when primary and permanent teeth are developing. It is also beneficial for adults.

Intuitively, it may seem like the more fluoride, the better! However, this is not the case! Too much fluoride, particularly in young children can be damaging to tooth enamel. It can lead to a tooth discoloration called dental fluorosis.

Children 8 years of age and younger, when permanent teeth are forming underneath the gums, are at risk of dental fluorosis. Once permanent teeth have come in fully, fluoride will no longer cause dental fluorosis. Although fluorosis can be cosmetically treated, the stains left by fluorosis are permanent and may darken over time.

But how bad is it really? Dentists have rated the severity of fluorosis using the following degrees:

  • Questionable: The enamel may show a few white spots or lines.
  • Very mild: Less than 25% of the tooth surface is affected by small opaque white spots.
  • Mild: Less than 50% of the tooth surface is affected by white opaque areas . Research suggests that mild cases of fluorosis may actually be beneficial for children. A 2009 study published in The Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that molars with fluorosis are more resistant to cavities than normal molars.
  • Moderate: 50% of the enamel surface is affected by white opaque areas.
  • Severe: All enamel surfaces are affected. Teeth may also have pitting and are at risk of dental erosion.

Common sources of fluoride include tap water, toothpaste, mouth rinses, gels, beverages and foods, and prescription supplements. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 75% of individuals' fluoride intake is from drinking water and processed beverages. You can minimize the risk of your child developing dental fluorosis by monitoring their fluoride intake. Find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water at home. Recommendations for adequate fluoride levels in drinking water are 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter. According to the World Health Organization, fluoride levels above 1.5 mg/L can lead to dental fluorosis.

Fluoride in toothpaste is important to protect kids' teeth against tooth decay. However, the CDC recommends avoiding fluoride toothpaste at all until age 2. Only place a pea-sized amount on your child's toothbrush and monitor your child’s brushing to ensure that they are not swallowing the toothpaste. To promote spitting out toothpaste, avoid purchasing toothpastes containing flavors your child is likely to swallow. If a child ingests a large amount of fluoride in a short period of time, it may cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain.

If treatment is necessary for your child, most options vary from tooth whitening to veneers or full crowns. Make sure to keep all fluoride-containing products out of the reach of young children.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van Orenstein. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/dental-fluorosis-what-you-should-know.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19571049

http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/dental_fluorosis.htm

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/fluorosis

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/products/how-much-fluoride1.htm

http://www.webmd.com/children/fluorosis-symptoms-causes-treatments?page=3

http://images.goodfood.com.au/2012/12/24/3911889/smilewide-620x349.jpg

http://parentingpatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Fluoride-Supplements-for-Infants-Hot-Topic-Tuesday-Blog-Hop.jpg

Trick or Treat, Brush Your Teeth!

October 31st, 2014

Happy Halloween from the Wellesley Dental Group! In just a few hours, the night will be filled with scary goblins, ghosts, and princesses too! Typical Halloween activities include costume parties, trick-or-treating, pumpkin carving, scary movies, haunted houses, bobbing for apples, and many more spooky events. All around the world, Halloween night is commonly anticipated by the young and even the young at heart! Have you ever wondered how this tradition came about?

Many historians believe that Halloween originated in North America from Celtic nations, including Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Isle of Man, Cornwall, and Brittany. It is believed to be influenced by the Celtic festival of Samhain, meaning "summer's end" in Old Irish. Samhain marks the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. For the superstitious, it was believed that the coming winter was accompanied by spirits. They believed that by dressing up in costumes, the spirits wandering in the dark would be fooled and tricked away. At the end of the night, it is said that the Celts would create a bonfire built by their priests. Similar to Halloween, these creative costumes, apples, bonfires, folk plays, and going from door to door reciting verses in exchange for food are all a part of the celebration!

Other historians believe the traditions of Halloween in North America stemmed from Parentalia, or the Festival of the Dead, celebrated in ancient Rome. Centuries later, we still see similar customs and traditions at this spooky time of year!

Today, a huge part of Halloween is loading up on a lot of candy. Each Halloween, children typically look forward to wearing a costume and going from house to house collecting candy by saying the magic words, "trick or treat!" Halloween can be a lot of fun for children because of the tasty candy being passed around. However, it is still important to keep good oral hygiene habits in mind during Halloween! The sugars in candy can lead to tooth decay and other oral health problems.

Here are a few tips to keep your smile healthy on Halloween:

  • Brush and floss after eating candy to reduce risk of tooth decay
  • Avoid hard, sticky and chewy candies
  • Limit the amount of candy consumed
  • Drink fluoridated water to keep teeth strong and help rinse away sugars

Also, did you know that Halloween has come to evolve in other countries around the world? Countries including Italy and Canada also celebrate Halloween. Other countries including Sweden, Norway, and Germany have also joined in the fun of Halloween! However, some countries, including Australia, are not so involved in Halloween.

This time of the year also marks the 7th Annual Candy Drive at the Wellesley Dental Group! Halloween is a fun and creative celebration, filled with family, friends, goblins, ghosts, superheros, princesses, and anything that you want to dress up as!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.jeremiahproject.com/culture/the_origins_of_halloween.html

http://cdn.history.com/sites/2/2013/11/Halloween-Hero-1-H.jpeg

http://patch.com/massachusetts/brookline/tricks-and-treats-halloween-0

http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Parentalia

Staying Hydrated Smart

June 20th, 2014

After eating a meal, working out, or even after performing routine activities, do you immediately grab a sports drink or a soda? These beverages are typically acidic and contain large amounts of sugar, leading to tooth decay. Even some fruit juices are packed with decay-causing sugar. Acids and sugars damage tooth enamel. Enamel is the outer surface of the tooth that helps protect them from an ordinary day's use. Once damage is caused to enamel, the damage is irreversible. Before you turn to sports drinks and sodas for hydration, consider reaching for a glass of water!

Staying hydrated, especially in the warm weather months, is essential for your overall health. Since water makes up more than half of your body weight, it is needed for proper function of tissues and organs, as well as for survival. Without water, your blood pressure, body temperature, and metabolism are at risk! A deficiency in body water can lead to dehydration and negative physical and psychological changes in your body. Those involved in sports, or have certain medical conditions are at a higher risk of dehydration and should consume greater amounts of water.

Some symptoms of dehydration include:

  • Dry or sticky mouth
  • Darker yellow urine
  • Dry skin
  • Headaches
  • Muscle cramps
  • Irritability or confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sunken eyes

Did you know that staying hydrated also helps your mouth? Hydration is particularly important in maintaining good oral health. Dehydration can lead to halitosis, dry mouth, gum disease, and possibly even heart disease! Drinking water will help increase your levels of bacteria-fighting saliva, and ultimately help reduce your chances of developing these common oral health problems. Along with brushing and flossing, drinking an adequate amount of water will help wash away bacteria in your mouth. The recommended daily intake of water for women is about 8 cups, and roughly 13 cups for men. Even though water is often the best option for staying hydrated, a glass of milk can also be a good beverage for replenishing energy after a day of hard work.

Here are a few tips for staying hydrated:

  • Try carrying a reusable water bottle around with you during the day.
  • If you find water to be too plain, consider adding a slice of lemon.
  • Make sure to drink water before, during and after your exercise.
  • Start and end your day with a glass of water.
  • Order water when dining out. It’s not only healthy, but also free!
  • Try drinking water with each meal or snack to help make it a routine.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/quest-for-hydration?page=1

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256

http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/food-nutrition/nutrients/hydration-why-its-so-important.html

http://media.coreperformance.com/images/411*308/knowledge-hydration1.jpg

 

Water Flossing vs Traditional Flossing

April 27th, 2014

Waterpik-ultra-water-flosserWater flossers are an alternative to traditional flossing.  Popular water flossers like the "Waterpik" use a pulsating stream of water of different pressures to whisk away food particles and bacteria stuck in between teeth.  Traditional flossing, on the other hand, uses a string of floss in order to rub against the tight junctions between individual teeth to also remove plaque, bacteria, and food particles.

Traditional floss is most effective in removing plaque and preventing plaque from becoming tartar (hardened plaque).  Tartar, also known as dental calculus, can cause gingivitis which can be a risk factor for ultimately developing gum disease.  An ADA spokesperson and Chicago-based dentist, Mary Hayes says, "Flossing scrapes off the sticky film of bacteria, while a Waterpik just rinses it."  However, one way in which water flossing can be beneficial is if you have braces and traditional flossing becomes more difficult for you.  Water flossing can easily be navigated between the network of wires and brackets while string floss can be much more cumbersome.  Regardless, many dentists warn that water flossing should never replace traditional flossing.

Both water flossers and traditional flossing are effective in maintaing good oral health.  People are advised to floss at least once every day to get rid of particles that are unable to be reached by regular brushing.  People are more likely to use a water flosser daily because it is more enjoyable and fun to use.  However, many dentists agree that traditional flossing is still the best method to clean the hard to reach places between teeth.  Furthermore, traditional floss is much more mobile in the sense that you can carry a floss pick or a spool of floss almost anywhere you go.  Using both a water flosser and a traditional flosser would be a great addition to an oral healthcare routine, but not necessary.  If you decide to employ both methods of flossing into your routine, first use the string floss first to break up plaque.  Then, use the water floss to flush the debris out and follow up with your normal brushing routine with fluoride toothpaste.  

In order to ensure that you are flossing correctly, following these illustrated guidelines:

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Sources:

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/products/waterpik-better-than-flossing.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/expert-answers/dental-floss/faq-20058112

http://parkridgedds.com/ask-the-dentist-floss-vs-waterpik/

http://www.ada.org/sections/publicResources/pdfs/watch_materials_floss.pdf

http://blog.beamtoothbrush.com/?p=428

http://www.livestrong.com/article/287399-waterpik-vs-floss/

Flossing instructions image: http://wichitafamilydentistry.com/how2floss.jpg

Image credit: http://waterpikultrawaterflosserreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Waterpik-ultra-water-flosser.jpg

How Much Water Should I Drink?

April 15th, 2014

womandrinkingwaterWe are all made up primarily of water.  In fact, about 60% of our body weight is water.  Water is crucial in the proper functioning of all of our physiological systems from flushing out harmful toxins to facilitating the travel of nutrients from one location to another.  We are constantly losing water through processes like sweating, breathing, and excretion.

The Institute of Medicine advises men to drink about 3 liters (13 cups) of water daily while women should drink about 2.2 liters (9 cups) of water daily.  Another way to calculate how much water you should drink, is to use the "half your body weight" rule.  For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you should drink half that number in ounces (75 ounces of water).  One cup is defined as 8 ounces of water.  So, a 100 pound person should drink about 9.4 cups of water daily.  However, these guidelines for adequate intake of water will varying depending on individual lifestyles.  For example, an athlete that is constantly exercising or a person that lives in a hot, humid environment will need more water on a daily basis.  Intuitively, this makes sense.  You are losing fluids and electrolytes more quickly as you sweat more.

Surprisingly, thirst and dry mouth should not be used as accurate indicators of when to drink.  In fact, once you already feel these symptoms, your body is already dehydrated.  Dehydration can lead to a host of negative symptoms including: fatigue, headaches, dizziness, and weak muscles.  One effective way of determining whether or not you are drinking enough water is to examine the color of your urine.  A dark yellow color indicates dehydration while a clearer, lighter color indicates proper hydration.

The wide-range of benefits of drinking water are well-known.  Research has shown that sufficient water intake results in a better balance of body fluids, weight loss, healthier looking skin, and better bowel function.  Water is also beneficial for your teeth.  Water can wash away food debris and acidic residue left behind on teeth which keeps saliva levels high.  High saliva levels are necessary for combating cavities.  Furthermore, water can dilute high-sugar drinks and mitigate some of its harmful effects.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Sources:
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/not-drinking-enough-water-per-day-2786.html
http://healthy-alkaline-water.com/side-effects-of-not-drinking-enough-water/
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256
http://www.joybauer.com/photo-gallery/5-fortifying-foods-for-your-teeth/Water.aspx
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/blogs/eat-run/2013/09/13/the-truth-about-how-much-water-you-should-really-drink

Image credit: http://www.wellness.uci.edu/images/womandrinkingwater.jpg

Tooth Brush Training 101

March 16th, 2014

mom baby learning tooth brushing techniques Does your child seem unexcited about brushing their teeth? Help your child care for their teeth by teaching them proper oral care at a young age. This investment in their health will be a lifelong reward! Start by showing your child that the task of brushing is valuable. Brushing along with your child, or creating catchy songs for brushing will help encourage oral health.

The following tips are easy practices that parents can follow to get your child enthusiastic to brush their teeth and reduce their risk from getting cavities:                  

Let your child pick out the materials

When shopping for oral care products, let your child choose his or her own toothbrush and toothpaste. A favorite television show character, or bright colors on their toothbrush may positively change their attitude when brushing their teeth. Also, allowing them to choose from an array of toothpaste flavors can go a long way!

Make brushing a fun game

Join in with your child as they brush! Try making it a competition, such as seeing who can brush every tooth. This will up their performance in brushing, while also making the routine more exciting.

Offer your child rewards

For each time your child cooperatively brushes their teeth, give them a sticker or small reward. Making a rewards board can be a great motivator for promoting good oral health practices. This can boost you child's  self-esteem and make them look forward to brushing.

Buy a fun flossing device

Flossing is an essential part of good oral hygiene. Flossing is particularly important for children because it eliminates plaque in places that the toothbrush misses. Encourage the habit of flossing by buying a colorful flossing tool.

A healthy child begins with healthy teeth! By making the routine of tooth brushing fun, children will be more eager to brush their teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.whattoexpect.com/toddler-health/learning-to-brush-teeth.aspx
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Video-Library/No-More-Nasties.cvsp
http://www.beliefnet.com/~/media/D8B3436649CB4E07BB83160F49A5214A.ashx?w=333&h=250&c=1

March is National Nutrition Month!

March 8th, 2014

children healthyCelebrate the 41st  anniversary of National Nutrition Month! Sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, this year’s theme, “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right,” reminds us to balance between the mouthwatering foods we crave and the nutrients we our body’s require. Establishing healthy eating habits is crucial to our dental health. Nutritious foods play a major role in preventing tooth decay and gum disease. We often purchase certain foods over others merely due to their sensational taste. However, it is important to evaluate and make constructive changes to our diets in order to protect our teeth!

The best food choices for enhancing oral health include an array of tasty diary products, nuts, vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean meats, fish, and more! These foods protect tooth enamel by providing essential vitamins, nutrients, and protein. Check out the Dietary Guidelines for tips on nutritious consumption and portion sizing.

Foods Rich in Calcium

Milk, dairy, and cheeses all contain a considerable amount of calcium, which protects teeth from acid and bacteria that causes decay.

Fruits and Vegetables are Essential

Cucumbers, celery, carrots, apples, and bananas are some of the many nutritious fruits and vegetables that help eliminate plaque from teeth and freshen breath. Studies also indicate that cranberries stop the formation of plaque.

Water is Important!

Rinse sugars and acids away with water to prevent teeth from decaying.

Are You a Sandwich-Lover?

Replace white bread with whole grain to increase your fiber consumption. Instead of mayonnaise, try avocado, which contains several essential vitamins. Don’t forget to add other fiber-containing vegetables like tomatoes.

Watch Out for Sugar and Acidic-Rich Foods!

Limit added sugars, salts and saturated fats from your diet, especially when snacking. Sugary and acidic foods and beverages easily damage teeth by forming plaque. Train your taste buds to enjoy foods that promote the health of your teeth.

After meals, remember to brush and floss your teeth to remove food particles. By eating healthy foods that do not deteriorate your tooth enamel, you can keep your mouth and heart healthy. After all, the mouth is the entrance to the body!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.Pradhan. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/nutrition-month/tooth-friendly-foods/prweb9238441.htm

http://www.choosemyplate.gov

http://www.eatright.org/NNM/#

http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs2010-PolicyDocument.htm

http://imagelib4.circleofmoms.com/live_comm_6685

 

High Calorie Drinks Reduced In Schools

September 6th, 2012

A while ago, we blogged about a possible sugar tax being implemented on foods with added sugar and sweeteners, such as soft drinks. It was designed to discourage both adults and children from purchasing unhealthy food and drink. Now it seems that the next step has been taken by reducing the availability of these items in schools, helping to further combat obesity.

There has been a huge reduction in drink calorie content available in schools (90%) between 2004-10. These numbers reflect the partnership between the William J. Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association with major drink companies to lessen these drinks' availability.

Vending machines in schools now look much different than in previous years. An assortment of water, milk, juice and sports drinks is what's typically available versus an assortment of sodas before. An assessment of the foods offered in school cafeterias will be underway soon as well.

As the obesity rate climbed, officials began to take notice and search for the cause. Christopher Ashley, supervisor of food and nutrition for Springfield City Schools, said:

“Nine years ago I came into this segment of food service, and you’d see a Honey Buns and two Mountain Dews for breakfast. Now kids are going through the line and getting a better breakfast. That’s just the start.”

The alliance between the William J. Clinton Foundation and beverage companies should continue to make a difference. As stated above, obesity rates have dropped significantly in the past few years. With an emphasis placed on health and wellness not just in schools, but in the media, it is believed that the rate will continue to drop. Once the school menus reflect the nutrition of the drinks, students will be at a major advantage for better overall health.

It's important to note that reducing the consumption of soft drinks will improve your smile! Drs. Ali & Ali are committed to spreading oral health awareness and urge you to opt for healthier drinks that don't damage teeth. Feel free to contact us with any questions at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

Fluoride Levels in Wellesley Water Supply

July 2nd, 2012

The Town of Wellesley has recently released their Drinking Water Consumer Awareness Report for 2011. Part of the report details the amount of fluoride in the water, and in Wellesley, there is an average of 1.02 ppm (parts per million). The highest level allowed is 4 ppm.

The fluoride is added to the water to help maintain dental health. According to Colgate, it helps prevent cavities in the following two ways:

- Fluoride concentrates in the growing bones and developing teeth of children, helping to harden the enamel on baby and adult teeth before they emerge.

- Fluoride helps to harden the enamel on adult teeth that have already emerged.

Please contact us at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to learn more about the effects of fluoride on the teeth!

Acidic Drinks and Tooth Erosion

May 2nd, 2012

Have you ever taken a moment to think about what soda is doing to your teeth? Dentists have talked about the damaging effects of soda and other sugary, carbonated drinks on teeth for a long time. However, people still consume too much of them on a daily basis.

Research also shows that acidic fruit juice, such as orange juice, and energy drinks are just as corrosive to enamel. Constant consumption bathes the teeth in a sugary, acidic mixture that strips away tooth enamel over time.

What’s important to remember about enamel erosion is that it’s far more dangerous than decay. This is because by drinking these harmful beverages, you are exposing teeth to its corrosive properties all at once. Serious break down of the teeth can occur and may result in crowns or dentures depending on the severity.

You don’t have to give up these types of drinks all together. Like anything, moderation is key. There are techniques you can implement to help minimize erosion.

1. If you drink the acidic beverage all at once, instead of sipping it all day, you won’t constantly bathe teeth in acid or excess sugar.

2. By using a straw, you avoid having the liquid wash your teeth in the harmful acid and sugar.

3. Rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic or sugary beverages.

4. Make a healthier choice and opt for water.

Thankful

May 3rd, 2010

Though we always have much to be thankful for, today we are very thankful that the MWRA water outage does not affect our patients in terms of getting their dental work. 

Communities affected
by boil water order

List Updated May 2, 2010 10:00AM
Arlington
Belmont
Boston
Brookline
Canton
Chelsea
Everett
Hanscom AFB
Lexington
Lynnfield W.D.
Malden
Marblehead
Medford
Melrose
Milton
Nahant
Norwood
Newton
Quincy
Reading
Revere
Saugus
Somerville
Stoneham
Swampscott
Wakefield
Waltham
Watertown
Winchester
Winthrop
Communities that are not listed above are NOT affected by this boil water order.

Dental offices in the affected towns must be using backup water sources - they are not able to use the public water supply for things like cleanings, rinsing, etc - really wonder how they are dealing with this, and how inconvenienced patients are who had taken time off for appointments they may never have.

Many of our patients coming from MWRA affected communities at least were able to grab some coffee here - I don't know what people are doing without their Dunkin Donuts (more on that here)

Is my tap water fluoridated?

February 16th, 2010

If your home uses a public drinking water supply, your children may or may not be getting a helpful amount of fluoride from tap water.  What we recommend to one patient may not apply to another, depending on where that patient lives.

As a community dentist, we see patients from a variety of towns and have researched which towns are supplementing the water supply with fluoride to bring it to a level (1.0 mg/L or 1 part per million) that will help prevent against childhood cavities.

The attached list is based on the most current information at the Centers for Disease Control. New information may be available at your local Water Resources Department.

We've listed most towns surrounding Wellesley, including Weston, Needham, Dover, Waltham, Newton, Dedham, Natick, and Wayland.

Town by Town Fluoridation List

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