worry

Dental Anxiety Help - 3

February 11th, 2011

Dental Anxiety Help 3 - "To worry or not to worry"

In this blog series, Dental Anxiety Help, ou guest contributor was, Andre Perreault, LMHC. At the bottom of each “Dental Anxiety Help” you can find links to previous entries as well. If you’d like to reach Mr. Perreault directly, please call him at (617) 835-6581.

Dental Anxiety Help 3 - "To worry or not to worry"

“Oh, don’t worry about it,”

This is a throw away line that we might hear several times in any day. Those who worry know though that it is hard to simply ‘not worry about it’. Worry has staying power. It is unpleasant. On the other hand it actually can be helpful. It motivates us to be prepared, to be aware or to accomplish something. While that is true, too much of an internal push to prepare, be aware, or to ‘get there’ can be detrimental. Worry, simply, is only helpful until it isn’t. When we have some control over what it is we worry about then worry can be helpful. You have a paper due and you’re worried about it? Then worry may push you to do the paper and it’s done. When it comes to a dental visit though, much of the control is in the gloved hands of your competent dentist.

So tip #2 is to build trust with your dentist. Now, I know this is a difficult task for many folks. Building trust in your dentist will take some effort on the part of your dentist and your dental health, in addition to your mental health, is worth the extra attention. Call your dentist and let them know you are having some difficulty with nerves or anxiety. There are many people who do this. Your dentist will be happy to set up a time to meet with you, and hear your concerns. Your dentist has seen this before and will know what to do. They will be gentle with you, make you comfortable, and make you familiar with the process and procedures.

Previous entries in Dental Anxiety Help series

Entry 1 - "I think I have dental phobia" Click here
Entry 2 - "Reality Check" Click here

For more information on how Wellesley Dental Group can help with sedation dentistry, please click here

Dental Anxiety Help 5

October 29th, 2009

Dental Anxiety Help 5 - "Schedule your worry time"

Anxious?In this blog series, Dental Anxiety Help, we’d like to introduce our guest contributor, Andre Perreault, LMHC.  Every Wednesday we will be featuring his advice and helpful tips for people who experience anxiety, fear, and phobias about dental visits.  Please check back every week for more – we will tag our posts with “anxiety” for quick reference when viewing in a feeder program.  At the bottom of each “Dental Anxiety Help” you can find links to previous entries as well. If you’d like to reach Mr. Perreault directly, please call him at (617) 835-6581.

Dental Anxiety Help 5 - "Schedule your worry time"

 

Sometimes it's so hard to stop a worry.  Sometimes it may be better just to go ahead and worry, but only a little.  Worry thoughts have a distinct ability to hang around.  They can linger once they start so one approach to accomodating this strong urge to worry is to schedule it in. Yes, really.

So Tip #4 is to schedule your worry time.  Pick a time, perhaps a 10 to 15 minute block, every day during the week before your next dental appointment.  During that scheduled time, sit down at your desk, at your table, in a chair, and worry.  If you find it helpful to write down all the worries then do it.  You may find that once you are actively trying to worry it's a little more difficult than you would think.  Watch the clock and give yourself a few minutes to wrap up.  Also, keep track of what your worries are.  Write them down if you need to.  Then throughout the day as you worry, remind yourself to hold that thought until your next scheduled worry session.

 

 

Entry 1 - "I think I have dental phobia" Click here
Entry 2 - "Reality Check" Click here
Entry 3- "To worry or not to worry" Click here
Entry 4 - "Positive Outcomes" Click here
For more information on relaxation dentistry at Drs. Ali's office, please visit www.WellesleyDentalGroup.com and click on "Sedation" tab.

 

Dental Anxiety Help - 4

October 26th, 2009

Dental Anxiety Help - 4 "Positive Outcomes"

In this blog series, Dental Anxiety Help, we’d like to introduce our guest contributor, Andre Perreault, LMHC.  Every Wednesday we will be featuring his advice and helpful tips for people who experience anxiety, fear, and phobias about dental visits.  Please check back every week for more – we will tag our posts with “anxiety” for quick reference when viewing in a feeder program.  At the bottom of each “Dental Anxiety Help” you can find links to previous entries as well. If you’d like to reach Mr. Perreault directly, please call him at (617) 835-6581.

Dental Anxiety Help 4 - Positive Outcomes

"Worry takes a number of shapes and forms."

In your mind it can become an attempt at prediction.  In worry people often cycle through thoughts, reviewing every possible item of concern and fear as though maintaining that level of focus will allow anyone to predict and prevent anything unwanted.  This too is related to control and is actually quite a set-up for a bad experience at the dentist.

So tip #3 is to begin focusing on the positive outcomes of a successful visit to the dentist.  Ask yourself the question; "suppose my visit to the dentist goes really well, what would that look and feel like?"  Then mentally walk through the entire visit and imagine how it will go.  Walk through this with some detail!  Begin in the waiting room, end with the final rinse and spit.  Imagine the dentist smiling, and then you look up and say, "That went very well.  That's the best visit I've ever had."

I have one guideline for this exercise.  Avoid using the word "not."  That includes "doesn't, didn't, wouldn't, couldn't, don't, and won't."  Walk yourself through the visit telling yourself how your best dental visit did go, not how it didn't go.

Entry 1 - "I think I have dental phobia" Click here

Entry 2 - "Reality Check" Click here

Entry 3- "To worry or not to worry" Click here

 

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