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FDA's Update on Potentially Harmful Hand Sanitizers

August 9th, 2020

During these uncertain times we are all trying to be cautious about germs, which seem to be all around us! Staying safe and doing the best we can to avoid spreading and contracting COVID-19 is of extreme importance as cases and deaths continue to rise across the United States. Because our daily lives involve the constant sense of touch, it's necessary to keep our hands clean to help lower the number of germs present that could make us sick. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has created several guidelines to follow regarding the use of soap and water, as well as alcohol-based hand sanitizer. According to the CDC, soap and water are more effective at fighting certain microbes and viruses, including norovirusCryptosporidium, and Clostridioides difficile. Whereas, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer can help lower the presence of some microorganisms in particular situations. Take a look:

Yet, you may have seen through the media that recently there have been a number of recalls for certain hand sanitizer brands. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has drastically increased its list of hand sanitizers to avoid due to potentially dangerous ingredients. Back in June, the FDA reported the toxicity of some hand sanitizers due to the presence of methanol. Methanol is toxic to humans and can lead to dangerous complications, including permanent blindness, seizures, coma, and even death.

More recently, the FDA is concerned about the inadequate amounts of ethyl or isopropyl alcohol in hand sanitizers. Now, their list, which has hit over 100 products, contains both those with potentially toxic ingredients and those with insufficient levels of active ingredients like alcohol. The FDA reports that many of the hand sanitizers that are a part of their list of products to avoid were created in Mexico and imported to the United States. Recalls and importation warnings have been issued to prevent these potentially dangerous hand sanitizers from making it to the store shelves. The FDA advises against using any products from the manufacturers listed, even if only specific products are being recalled, and to avoid any product with the ingredient methanol. Also, be sure to monitor hand sanitizer use around young children to ensure that ingestion of product does not occur.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn noted, "Consumers must also be vigilant about which hand sanitizers they use, and for their health and safety we urge consumers to immediately stop using all hand sanitizers on the FDA's list of dangerous hand sanitizer products." Here is the most current list of hand sanitizers to avoid per the FDA:

  • Blumen Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer with 70% Alcohol
  • Blumen Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Clear Ethyl Alcohol 70%
  • BLUMEN Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Clear
  • BLUMEN Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Clear
  • KLAR AND DANVER Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • MODESA Instant Hand Sanitizer Moisturizers and Vitamin E
  • BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer Aloe
  • BLUMEN Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Lavender
  • BLUMEN Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Clear LEAR Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Clear LEAR Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • The Honeykeeper Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer Clear
  • BLUMEN Clear Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • BLUMEN Clear Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Aloe
  • BLUMEN Clear Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Lavender
  • BLUMEN Aloe Advanced Hand Sanitizer, with 70 Alcohol
  • BLUMEN Aloe Advanced Hand Sanitizer, with 70 Alcohol
  • Blumen Advanced Hand Sanitizer Lavender, with 70% alcohol
  • Blumen Advanced Hand Sanitizer Aloe, with 70% alcohol
  • Blumen Antibacterial Fresh Citrus Hand Sanitizer
  • Blumen Hand Sanitizer Fresh Citrus
  • KLAR and DANVER Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Hello Kitty Hand Sanitizer
  • Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer (Vitamin E and Aloe)
  • Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer (Aloe and Moisturizers)
  • Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer Vitamin E and Aloe
  • Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer Aloe and Moisturizers
  • BLUMEN Instant Hand Sanitizer Fragrance Free
  • BLUMEN Instant Hand Sanitizer Aloe Vera
  • Assured Aloe
  • bio aaa Advance Hand Sanitizer
  • LumiSkin Advance Hand Sanitizer 4 oz
  • LumiSkin Advance Hand Sanitizer 16 oz
  • QualitaMed Hand Sanitizer
  • NEXT Hand Sanitizer
  • Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer with 70% Alcohol extra soft with glycerin and aloe
  • NuuxSan Instant Antibacterial Hand Sanitizer
  • NuuxSan Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Assured Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Aloe and Moisturizers
  • Assured Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Vitamin E and Aloe
  • Modesa Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Moisturizers and Aloe Vera
  • Modesa Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Moisturizers and Vitamin E
  • Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70% Alcohol
  • Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70% Alcohol
  • Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70% Alcohol
  • Earths Amenities Instant Unscented Hand Sanitizer with Aloe Vera Advanced
  • Hand Sanitizer Agavespa Skincare
  • Vidanos Easy Cleaning Rentals Hand Sanitizer Agavespa Skincare
  • All-Clean Hand Sanitizer
  • Esk Biochem Hand Sanitizer
  • Lavar 70 Gel Hand Sanitizer
  • The Good Gel Antibacterial Gel Hand Sanitizer
  • CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol
  • CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 75% Alcohol
  • CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol
  • Saniderm Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • Hand sanitizer Gel Unscented 70% Alcohol
  • Medicare Alcohol Antiseptic Topical Solution
  • GelBact Hand Sanitizer
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • TriCleanz
  • Sayab Antisepctic Hand Sanitizer 100
  • Jaloma Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer Ethyl Alcohol 62% with Vitamin E
  • Leiper's Fork Distillery Bulk Disinfectant per 5 gallon and Leiper's Fork Distillery 16 oz bottle
  • Andy's Best
  • Andy's
  • NeoNatural
  • Plus Advanced
  • Optimus Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Optimus Lubricants Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Optimus Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Selecto Hand Sanitizer
  • Shine and Clean Hand Sanitizer
  • Hand Sanitizer Disinfectant Gel 70% Ethyl Alcohol
  • Hand Sanitizer Disinfectant Gel 70% Ethyl Alcohol Rinse Free Hand Rub
  • Mystic Shield Protection hand sanitizer
  • Born Basic. Anti-Bac Hand Sanitizer 70% alcohol
  • Born Basic. Anti-Bac Hand Sanitizer 65% Alcohol
  • Scent Theory -- Keep It Clean -- Pure Clean Anti-bacterial Hand Sanitizer
  • Cavalry
  • ENLIVEN Hand Sanitizing Gel
  • Lux Eoi Hand Sanitizing Gel
  • Scent Theory -- Keep It Clean -- Pure Clean Anti-bacterial Hand Sanitizer
  • Bersih Hand Sanitizer Gel Fragrance Free
  • Bersih Antiseptic Alcohol 70% Topical Solution hand sanitizer
  • Purity Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • Hand Sanitizer Gel Alcohol 70%
  • TriCleanz Tritanium Labs Hand Sanitizer
  • Britz Hand Sanitizer Ethyl Alcohol 70%
  • Parabola Hand Sanitizer
  • Urbane Bath and Body Hand Sanitizer
  • Cleaner Hand Sanitizer Rinse Free 70%
  • Handzer Hand Sanitizer Rinse Free
  • Kleanz Antibacterial Hand Sanitizer Advanced
  • Be Safe Hand Sanitizer
  • Wave Hand Sanitizer Gel
  • DAESI Hand Sanitizer

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2020/07/us/cnn-fda-hand-sanitizer-quiz-july-15-2020-trnd/

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/03/health/fda-hand-sanitizers-list-expands-trnd/index.html

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/health/fda-list-hand-sanitizers-trnd/index.html

https://i0.wp.com/post.healthline.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Hand_Sanitizer_1296x728-header.jpg?w=1155&h=1528

https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/hand-sanitizer-use.html

https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/campaign/provider-infographic-4.html

The Latest News on a COVID-19 Vaccine

August 5th, 2020

A new day brings new research! In times like these, we all are ready to resume some sense of normalcy. Currently, the best way to prevent sickness is to avoid exposure to the virus, which is mostly spread from person-to-person contact. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone should continue washing their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, practice social distancing keeping a distance of at least 6 feet from others, wear a face covering, continuously clean and disinfect surfaces, and monitor your health daily.

Although there is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19, researchers across the globe are racing to produce a safe and effective vaccine to beat the virus. To date, there are currently 18,699,432 confirmed cases worldwide, with approximately 704,324 deaths reported. At the end of June, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that AstraZeneca, a global biopharmaceutical organization, in collaboration with Oxford University, along with the United States based pharmaceutical company Moderna Inc., were leading the way with an experimental Covid-19 vaccine. AstraZeneca and Oxford University are currently in Phase 3 of human trials and plan to release results this October.

More recently, on July 30th the company Johnson & Johnson began conducting human safety trials of a COVID-19 vaccine after exhibiting positive results from the vaccine when tested on monkeys. The study was published in the science journal Nature. They found that out of 6 monkeys tested with a single dose of the COVID-19 vaccine candidate, all 6 were protected from lung disease and 5 were protected from COVID-19. Dr. Dan Barouch, a virologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and a co-author of the new study mentioned, “It’s a very reassuring level of protection we saw.” Now it is the goal of Dr. Paul Stoffels, Johnson & Johnson’s chief scientific officer, to see whether or not these results will prove to have the same protective effect on humans. Johnson & Johnson plans to test the vaccine on 1,000 healthy individuals ranging in age from 18 to 55 years and 65 years and older. Their aiming to enter Phase 3 testing giving a single-shot to a greater portion of the population beginning in mid-September, while also studying the effectiveness of a two-shot COVID-19 vaccine.

But, this isn’t the only study going on! It is one of over 30 human trials for a COVID-19 vaccine across the globe. Two days prior to when Johnson & Johnson’s study was published, a comparable study from Moderna Inc. and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was published. However, their vaccines function in battling COVID-19 differently. Moderna’s vaccine candidate sends genetic messenger RNA into cells, which results in the creation of a coronavirus spike protein, which is hypothesized to initiate the body’s immune response. Moderna Inc. is expected to begin Phase 3 trials during this first week of August. On the other hand, Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine candidate uses a modified version of a common cold virus, adenovirus type 26, to bring the coronavirus spike protein into the body to initiate an immune response.

Plus, scientists are also enthusiastic about Novavax’s vaccine candidate in Maryland. In one study, the company found that their vaccine provided protection against coronavirus infections in monkeys. In addition, another study found that 56 volunteer participants had antibodies against the virus and did not have any dangerous side effects. As Novavax continues with Phase 1 trials, they hope to produce 100 million doses of the vaccine by the start of 2021 if the vaccine is proven to be safe and effective.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/07/jj-begins-human-trials-of-its-one-dose-covid-19-vaccine/?inf_contact_key=4c127a488872b6b59f88388fe4b5590e7e470d92b8b75168d98a0b8cac0e9c09

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/30/health/covid-19-vaccine-monkeys.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-who-development/astrazeneca-moderna-ahead-in-covid-19-vaccine-race-who-idUSKBN23X1WA

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/04/health/covid-19-vaccine-novavax.html

https://images.theconversation.com/files/341551/original/file-20200612-153812-ws3rqu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip

Bad Breath: A Possible Early Sign of Diabetes

August 1st, 2020

We Are Happy To Answer Your Bad Breath Questions | Katy, TX

With roughly 1.5 million Americans diagnosed each year, diabetes remains a silent killer, as early symptoms are often easy to miss. Interestingly, your breath could be warning you that something’s going on in your body. One of the many potential causes of bad breath, also known as halitosis, includes diabetes.

So, What is Diabetes?

The latest statistics noted by the American Diabetes Association reveal that approximately 34.2 million (10.5%) Americans had a diagnosis of diabetes in 2018. Plus, a whopping 88 million (34.5%) individuals aged 18 years or older have prediabetes in the U.S.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body has too much blood sugar (glucose) within the bloodstream. Some of the most common types of diabetes that you may have heard of include Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes, the body is blocked from producing insulin, which is normally released by the pancreas to absorb the sugar from the foods you eat for energy. Therefore, treatment involves taking insulin each day to help keep blood sugar levels under control. Type 1 is believed to be caused by an autoimmune response. On the other hand, individuals with Type 2 diabetes suffer from inadequate amounts of insulin release, or their bodies no longer appropriately respond to the action of insulin. Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with healthy lifestyle habits, including exercise, a healthy diet, and practicing good oral hygiene! Diabetes can have a negative, and sometimes life-threatening impact on major organs, including your heart, kidneys, and eyes.

 

Diabetes and Your Oral Health - McOmie Family Dentistry

Bad breath, a possible early sign of diabetes?

Individuals with diabetes may experience bad breath for several reasons which may be detected early. Early diagnosis and treatment of pre-diabetes and diabetes is important for early management and to lower the risk of detrimental complications to your overall health. Some of the common causes of bad breath in pre-diabetic/diabetic patients can include periodontal disease or ketoacidosis:

Periodontal disease:

  • What some people may not know is that diabetes can impact your oral health, and vice versa! This two-way relationship has been shown in several studies revealing a significant link between uncontrolled diabetes and the more severe form of gum disease, periodontitis, as well as severe gum disease being associated with high blood sugar levels.
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves oral bacteria which attack the oral tissues and bone that surround your teeth. Other systemic diseases, like heart disease and strokes, are linked to both diabetes and periodontal disease. Bad breath is a common sign of periodontal disease, and is typically a result of the bacteria within the mouth that produce volatile sulfur compounds. If blood sugar levels are not controlled, periodontal disease can progress and lead to tooth loss.

Ketoacidosis (DKA):

  • One of the complications of diabetes is ketoacidosis. This condition occurs when the body does not have enough insulin, which leads to certain cells not receiving enough energy from the uptake of sugar.
  • This causes your body to break down fat for energy, which consequently makes a high amount of acids in the blood called ketones. A high amount of ketones in your body can lead to bad breath, and you may notice a smell similar to nail polish. Once reaching an unsafe level, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs, which can present with a sweet and fruity odor on your breath, frequent urination, trouble breathing, confusion, abdominal pain, nausea, and/or vomiting. This condition can be life-threatening, and immediate medical attention is necessary if you experience these symptoms.Common Causes of Bad Breath

Take a look at some of the other associations between diabetes, oral health, and bad breath:

Dry mouth:

  • Diabetics may experience dry mouth, which can also cause bad breath. Your saliva does more than you may think! Without saliva, acid produced by oral bacteria can attack the surfaces of your teeth and lead to tooth decay/cavities. Not to mention, saliva helps wash away leftover food particles that the bacteria feed on. To fight dry mouth, stay hydrated with water. Chewing xylitol sugar free gum can also help stimulate saliva production. Dry mouth may also be a result of certain medications, including those taken for diabetes. Be sure to keep your dentist in the loop regarding all of your current medications.

Greater Risk of Infections:

  • Individuals with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing infections due to a weakened immune system. Plus, uncontrolled diabetics may experience slow wound healing due to poor circulation from high blood sugar levels. It is especially important to stay healthy and keep your immune system strong during these unprecedented times. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals with Type 2 diabetes are considered at a high risk for experiencing illness from COVID-19. Make sure to continue practicing social distancing, proper hand-washing and disinfecting, and wear a face covering to help fight coronavirus.
  • In addition, people with diabetes may be at a higher risk of developing an oral yeast infection, also known as oral thrush. Oral thrush often appears as a white coat on the tongue or inside of the cheeks and can result in uncomfortable mouth sores and ulcers, along with a foul odor and taste. Your dentist will be able to diagnose oral thrush and offer treatment recommendations.

Remember, your oral cavity is a window to the rest of your body so be sure to take care of it! Your body may be showing you small signs that relate to a bigger health issue. Keep up with your regular dental appointments and practice good oral hygiene at home. When tooth brushing, don’t forget to brush your tongue, which is a common ground for odor producing bacteria.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1312660/type-2-diabetes-signs-symptoms-diabetic-ketoacidosis-halitosis-blood-sugar

https://www.diabetes.org/resources/statistics/statistics-about-diabetes

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25342350/

https://www.shalby.org/blog/endocrinology-diabetology/diabetes-silent-killer/

https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/bad-breath

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/diabetes-and-other-endocrine-disorders/diabetes-and-dental-problems-0614

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fneed-extra-precautions%2Fgroups-at-higher-risk.html#diabetes

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetic-ketoacidosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20371551

https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmcomiedentistry.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F11%2Fdiabetes-oral-health-865x519.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmcomiedentistry.com%2Fdiabetes-oral-health%2F&tbnid=wibCrzMbrsmcWM&vet=12ahUKEwi0utSJsPrqAhUXRFMKHcY_CisQMygAegUIARCqAQ..i&docid=us3xVHL0O5gD9M&w=865&h=519&q=diabetes%20oral%20health&ved=2ahUKEwi0utSJsPrqAhUXRFMKHcY_CisQMygAegUIARCqAQ

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.smilegeneration.com%2Fblog%2Fsmile-facts%2Fcommon-causes-of-bad-breath%2F&psig=AOvVaw2l2w6ICnsYwZEoznSI1gqT&ust=1596384118408000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJCQk7aw-uoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Flathropdentalcenter.com%2Fblog%2F2017%2F06%2Fwe-are-happy-to-answer-your-bad-breath-questions%2F&psig=AOvVaw2l2w6ICnsYwZEoznSI1gqT&ust=1596384118408000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJCQk7aw-uoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAT

Battling Germs with UVC Lights

July 27th, 2020

At all times our caring team at WDG is putting your safety first. Although the world’s “new normal” might not be clear, we are fully prepared and equipped to keep you and your family safe when visiting with us. Since reopening, we have invested in several additional safety equipment, in addition to updating our protocols and training our staff to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Our office has introduced one of the more recent ground-breaking methods to remove airborne microbes: UVC sterilization technology.

What is UVC sterilization technology?

You might have heard about Ultraviolet (UV) light technology trending recently through the media. It's a hot topic, particularly because of its microbial disinfection benefits. UV light is a part of electromagnetic light, which is not visible to our eyes, that consists of wavelengths ranging from 100-400 nm. The UV spectrum is split into 3 parts including, UVA (long-wave: 315 to 400 nm), UVB (medium-wave: 280 to 315 nm), and UVC (short-wave: 100 to 280 nm)

Hospitals and large health corporations commonly use UV light devices for sterilization purposes with much success, both in terms of safety and efficiency. These devices may also prove to be a huge benefit for dental practices during this global pandemic.

As reported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), UVC sterilization technology devices use UVC light to compete against microorganisms (also referred to as being germicidal). This high energy short UV wavelength works to interfere with microbial DNA and consequently block their reproduction and prevent them from infecting the environment.

According to Dr. Richard Martinello, an associate professor at Yale School of Medicine and medical director of the Department of Infection Prevention at Yale New Haven Hospital, UV light has been found to be beneficial against coronaviruses, including Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Yet, more research needs to be done regarding UV light and its effect on battling COVID-19.

At WDG we've introduced these UV devices to protect our patients and staff:

UV-Sanitizing HEPA Air Purifiers

H13 HEPA air purifiers have been installed in the reception area and hallways. These purifiers have been tested to eliminate over 99.97% of airborne pollutants. Additionally, these purifiers have the built-in germicidal UV system that sanitizes the air of microorganisms including viruses and mold.

Sterilizing UV Lamps

In complement to our heightened airflow management and filtration systems, we have also installed UV lamps that sterilize the environment by breaking down microbe DNA.

As the sun continues to shine during these warm summer days, remember to keep these summer safety tips in mind as we all try to limit the spread of COVID-19. Plus, keeping your immune system healthy and strong during these unprecedented times is particularly important. Don't forget, your oral health is an essential part of your overall heath, and we are always here for you. If you experience any COVID-19 symptoms, postpone dental treatment and seek immediate medical care.

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/26/dental-practices-consider-using-uv-light-tech-to-safely-reopen.html

https://www.dentistryiq.com/dentistry/products/infection-control-and-instrument-management/article/14180067/uvc-sterilization-works-in-large-healthcare-settings-what-about-dental-offices?utm_source=DEC_DIQ+Morning+Briefing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CPS200721105&o_eid=3760I9143045C2X&rdx.ident%5Bpull%5D=omeda%7C3760I9143045C2X&oly_enc_id=3760I9143045C2X

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-04-uv-wont-covid-19but-disinfect-medical.html

https://www.todaysrdh.com/ultraviolet-germicidal-irradiation-dental-medical-settings-method-sterilization/

https://www.fda.gov/media/136533/download

https://in.dental-tribune.com/news/how-to-use-ultraviolet-light-uvc-to-fight-covid-19-effectively-in-dental-clinics-dr-ajay-bajaj/

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0024/5386/4500/files/Spectrum_of_Light.jpg?v=1528825019

https://facilityexecutive.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/UV.Covid-19.jpg

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